97 Things Every Programmer Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts

Voorkant
"O'Reilly Media, Inc.", 5 feb. 2010 - 258 pagina's
6 Recensies

Tap into the wisdom of experts to learn what every programmer should know, no matter what language you use. With the 97 short and extremely useful tips for programmers in this book, you'll expand your skills by adopting new approaches to old problems, learning appropriate best practices, and honing your craft through sound advice.

With contributions from some of the most experienced and respected practitioners in the industry--including Michael Feathers, Pete Goodliffe, Diomidis Spinellis, Cay Horstmann, Verity Stob, and many more--this book contains practical knowledge and principles that you can apply to all kinds of projects.

A few of the 97 things you should know:

  • "Code in the Language of the Domain" by Dan North
  • "Write Tests for People" by Gerard Meszaros
  • "Convenience Is Not an -ility" by Gregor Hohpe
  • "Know Your IDE" by Heinz Kabutz
  • "A Message to the Future" by Linda Rising
  • "The Boy Scout Rule" by Robert C. Martin (Uncle Bob)
  • "Beware the Share" by Udi Dahan
 

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LibraryThing Review

Gebruikersrecensie  - dcornwall - LibraryThing

Although this book is for programmers by programmers, I think any professional would pick up some good bits of wisdom from this book. Essays are short and vary from impenetrable jargon (for non ... Volledige recensie lezen

LibraryThing Review

Gebruikersrecensie  - cdelfino - LibraryThing

Good read for those who are into programming or development and need a good of general advice straight from professionals who had longer years of experience in the field. Doesn't focus on specific ... Volledige recensie lezen

Inhoudsopgave

Learn to Say Hello World
102
Let Your Project Speak for Itself
104
The Linker Is Not a Magical Program
106
The Longevity of Interim Solutions
108
Make Interfaces Easy to Use Correctly and Hard to Use Incorrectly
110
Make the Invisible More Visible
112
Message Passing Leads to Better Scalability in Parallel Systems
114
A Message to the Future
116

Check Your Code First Before Looking to Blame Others
18
Choose Your Tools with Care
20
Code in the Language of the Domain
22
Code Is Design
24
Code Layout Matters
26
Code Reviews
28
Coding with Reason
30
A Comment on Comments
32
Comment Only What the Code Cannot Say
34
Continuous Learning
36
Convenience Is Not an ility
38
Deploy Early and Often
40
Distinguish Business Exceptions from Technical
42
Do Lots of Deliberate Practice
44
DomainSpecific Languages
46
Dont Be Afraid to Break Things
48
Dont Be Cute with Your Test Data
50
Dont Ignore That Error
52
Dont Just Learn the Language Understand Its Culture
54
Dont Nail Your Program into the Upright Position
56
Dont Rely on Magic Happens Here
58
Dont Repeat Yourself
60
Dont Touch That Code
62
Encapsulate Behavior Not Just State
64
FloatingPoint Numbers Arent Real
66
Fulfill Your Ambitions with Open Source
68
The Golden Rule of API Design
70
The Guru Myth
72
Hard Work Does Not Pay Off
74
How to Use a Bug Tracker
76
Improve Code by Removing It
78
Install Me
80
Interprocess Communication Affects Application Response Time
82
Keep the Build Clean
84
Know How to Use CommandLine Tools
86
Know Well More Than Two Programming Languages
88
Know Your IDE
90
Know Your Limits
92
Know Your Next Commit
94
Large Interconnected Data Belongs to a Database
96
Learn Foreign Languages
98
Learn to Estimate
100
Missing Opportunities for Polymorphism
118
Testers Are Your Friends
120
One Binary
122
Only the Code Tells the Truth
124
Own and Refactor the Build
126
Pair Program and Feel the Flow
128
Prefer DomainSpecific Types to Primitive Types
130
Prevent Errors
132
The Professional Programmer
134
Put Everything Under Version Control
136
Put the Mouse Down and Step Away from the Keyboard
138
Read Code
140
Read the Humanities
142
Reinvent the Wheel Often
144
Resist the Temptation of the Singleton Pattern
146
The Road to Performance Is Littered with Dirty Code Bombs
148
Simplicity Comes from Reduction
150
The Single Responsibility Principle
152
Start from Yes
154
Step Back and Automate Automate Automate
156
Take Advantage of Code Analysis Tools
158
Test for Required Behavior Not Incidental Behavior
160
Test Precisely and Concretely
162
Test While You Sleep and over Weekends
164
Testing Is the Engineering Rigor of Software Development
166
Thinking in States
168
Two Heads Are Often Better Than One
170
Two Wrongs Can Make a Right and Are Difficult to Fix
172
Ubuntu Coding for Your Friends
174
The Unix Tools Are Your Friends
176
Use the Right Algorithm and Data Structure
178
Verbose Logging Will Disturb Your Sleep
180
WET Dilutes Performance Bottlenecks
182
When Programmers and Testers Collaborate
184
Write Code As If You Had to Support It for the Rest of Your Life
186
Write Small Functions Using Examples
188
Write Tests for People
190
You Gotta Care About the Code
192
Your Customers Do Not Mean What They Say
194
Contributors
196
Index
221
Copyright

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Over de auteur (2010)

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant and trainer. His work focuses on patterns and architecture, programming techniques and languages, and development process and practice. He has been a columnist for various magazines and online publications, including The Register, Better Software, Java Report, CUJ, and C++ Report. Kevlin is co-author of two volumes in the Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture series: A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing and On Patterns and Pattern Languages. He also contributed to 97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know

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