Economy and Society: An Outline of Interpretive Sociology, Volumes 1-2

Voorkant
Univ of California Press, 1978 - 1469 pagina's
Max Weber's Economy and Society is the greatest sociological treatise written in this century. Published posthumously in Germany in the early 1920s, it has become a constitutive part of the modern sociological imagination.
 

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LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
xxv
PREFACE
xxxi
INTRODUCTION by Guenther Roth
xxxiii
ITS IMPERSONALITY AND ETHIC Fragment
xxxiv
BUREAUCRACY
xxxvi
The Legal Forms of Medieval Trading Enterprises
xl
The Roman Empire and Imperial Germany
xlvi
VOLUME 2
lii
The Concept of Trade and Its Principal Forms
156
The Concept of Trade and Its Principal FormsContinued
157
29a The Concept of Trade and Its Principal FormsConcluded
159
Tsarist Patrimonialism 1064
160
The Conditions of Maximum Formal Rationality of Capital Accounting
161
The Principal Modes of Capitalistic Orientation of ProfitMaking
164
Currency Money
166
Restricted Money
174

A Political Typology of Antiquity
liv
The Planning of Economy and Society
lxii
Rule of the CouncilPatriciate and of the Crafts in Northern Europe 1281
lxiv
Appendices
lxvi
FORMAL AND SUBSTANTIVE RATIONALIZATIONTHEOCRATIC
lxxxii
POLITICAL COMMUNITIES
lxxxiii
Conclusion 1002
lxxxv
Characteristics of Modern Bureaucracy 956
xcv
THE PLEBEIAN CITY 1301
xcviii
Parliament and Government in a Reconstructed Germany
civ
Acknowledgements
cx
CONCEPTUAL EXPOSITION
1
Basic Sociological Terms
3
The Definitions of Sociology and of Social Action
4
The Impact
5
The Realities of Party Politics and the Fallacy of the Corporate State 1395
7
INDEX
8
The Maintenance of Patrimonial Officials Benefices in Kind
10
B Social Action
22
Types of Social Action
24
The Concept of Social Relationship
26
Usage Custom SelfInterest
29
Legitimate Order
31
Convention and Law
33
Tradition Faith Enactment
36
Conflict Competition Selection
38
Communal and Associative Relationships
40
Open and Closed Relationships
43
Representation and Mutual Responsibility
46
The Organization
48
Consensual and Imposed Order in Organizations
50
Administrative and Regulative Order
51
Enterprise Formal Organization Voluntary and Compulsory Association
52
Power and Domination
53
Political and Hierocratic Organizations
54
Notes
56
Chapter II
61
Sociological Categories of Economic Action
63
The Concept of Utility
68
Modes of the Economic Orientation of Action
69
Typical Measures of Rational Economic Action
71
Types of Economic Organizations
74
Media of Exchange Means of Payment Money
75
The Primary Consequences of the Use of Money Credit
80
The Market
82
Formal and Substantive Rationality of Economic Action
85
The Rationality of Monetary Accounting Management and Budgeting
86
The Concept and Types of ProfitMaking The Role of Capital
90
Calculations in Kind
100
Substantive Conditions of Formal Rationality in a Money Economy
107
3
108
Market Economies and Planned Economies
109
Chapter XV
112
Types of Economic Division of Labor
114
Types of the Technical Division of Labor
118
Types of the Technical Division of LaborContinued
120
Social Aspects of the Division of Labor
122
Social Aspects of the Division of LaborContinued
125
The Appropriation of the Material Means of Production
130
The Appropriation of Managerial Functions
136
The Expropriation of Workers from the Means of Production
137
Continued
139
The Concept of Occupation and Types of Occupational Structure
140
24a The Principal Forms of Appropriation and of Market Relationship
144
Conditions Underlying the Calculability of the Productivity of Labor
150
Forms of Communism
153
Capital Goods and Capital Accounting
154
Note Money
176
The Formal and Substantive Validity of Money
178
Methods and Aims of Monetary Policy
180
A Critical Note on the State Theory of Money
184
The NonMonetary Significance of Political Bodies for the Economic Order
193
The Financing of Political Bodies
194
Repercussions of Public Financing on Private Economic Activity
199
The Influence of Economic Factors on the Formation of Organizations
201
The Mainspring of Economic Activity
202
Notes
206
Chapter III
212
LEGAL AUTHORITY WITH A BUREAUCRATIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
217
POLITICAL AND HIEROCRATIC DOMINATION
218
The Pure TypeContinued
220
Monocratic Bureaucracy
223
The Pure TypeContinued
228
Benefices and Fiefs
235
Types of Patrimonial Codification 856
236
THE ROUTINIZATION OF CHARISMA
246
FEUDALISM STńNDESTAAT AND PATRIMONIALISM
248
FEUDALISM
255
INDEX
258
Combinations of the Different Types of Authority
262
COLLEGIALITY AND THE DIVISION OF POWERS
271
The Functionally Specific Division of Powers
282
DIRECT DEMOCRACY AND REPRESENTATIVE ADMINISTRATION
289
Representation by the Agents of Interest Groups
297
Excursus on Collegiate Bodies and Interest Groups 994
305
THE ECONOMY AND THE ARENA
309
The Economic Relationships of Organized Groups
339
Household Neighborhood and Kin Group
356
Household Enterprise and Oikos
370
The Rise of the Calculative
375
The Oikos
381
Theoretical Ambiguities
387
Nationality and Cultural Prestige
395
Canonical Writings Dogmas and Scriptural Religion
457
Preaching and Pastoral Care as Results of Prophetic Religion
464
THE FORMAL QUALITIES OF REVOLUTIONARY LAW
469
Aristocratic Irreligion versus Warring for the Faith
472
The French Civil Code 865
480
THE RELIGION OF NONPRIVILEGED STRATA
481
The Religious Equality of Women Among Disprivileged Strata
488
HighStatus Intellectuals as Religious Innovators
502
The Intellectualism of Higher and LowerRanking Strata in Ancient
508
Modern Intellectual Status Groups and Secular Salvation Ideologies
515
Predestination and Providence
522
Notes
529
Salvation Through Good Works
532
The Certainty of Grace and the Religious Virtuosi
538
Mysticism versus Asceticism
544
The Decisive Differences Between Oriental and Occidental Salvation
551
The Governments Failure to Curb Harmful Monarchic
552
SOTERIOLOGY OR SALVATION FROM OUTSIDE
557
Salvation Through Faith Alone and Its AntiIntellectual Consequences
563
Salvation Through Belief in Predestination
572
Familial Piety Neighborly Help and Compensation
579
POLITICS
590
Natural Law and Vocational Ethics
597
The Religious Status of Marriage and of Women
604
THE GREAT RELIGIONS AND THE WORLD
611
The ThisWorldliness of Islam and Its Economic Ethics
623
Jesus Indifference Toward the World
630
Sect Church and Democracy 1204
634
Its Impersonality and Ethic Fragment
635
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Over de auteur (1978)

Max Weber, a German political economist, legal historian, and sociologist, had an impact on the social sciences that is difficult to overestimate. According to a widely held view, he was the founder of the modern way of conceptualizing society and thus the modern social sciences. His major interest was the process of rationalization, which characterizes Western civilization---what he called the "demystification of the world." This interest led him to examine the three types of domination or authority that characterize hierarchical relationships: charismatic, traditional, and legal. It also led him to the study of bureaucracy; all of the world's major religions; and capitalism, which he viewed as a productof the Protestant ethic. With his contemporary, the French sociologist Emile Durkheim---they seem not to have known each other's work---he created modern sociology.

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