Freud and Philosophy: An Essay on Interpretation

Voorkant
Yale University Press, 1970 - 573 pagina's
If Paul Ricoeur is correct in seeing the various currents of contemporary philosophy all converging on the problem of a "grand philosophy of language," then the first sixty pages of this absorbing study of Freud may become the rallying point from which future work can begin.This first part of Freud and Philosophy, "Problematic," presents a profound and clear theory of signification, symbol, and interpretation. The second part, "A Reading of Freud," is required reading for anyone seriously interested in psychoanalysis. The third section interpretation of Ricoeur's own theory of symbol—particularly religious symbol—which places this study at the center of contemporary debate over the sense of myth.In this book are revealed Ricoeur the philosopher of language; Ricoeur the critic of Freud; and Ricoeur the theologian of religious symbol. The author is outstanding in all three roles, and the book that emerges is of rare profundity, enormous scope, and complete timeliness.Paul Ricoeur is professor of philosophy at the University of Paris. “Paul Ricouer…has done a study that is all too rare these days, in which one intellect comes to grips with another, in which a scholar devotes himself to a thoughtful, searching, and comprehensive study of a genius…The final result is a unique survey of the panorama of Freudian thought by an observer who, although starting from outside, succeeds in penetrating to its core.” –American Journal of Psychiatry
“Primarily an inquiry into the foundations of language and hermeneutics…[Ricoeur uses] the Freudian 'hermeneutics of suspicion' as a corrective and counter-balance for phenomenology and create a 'new phenomenology'…This important work…should have an impact upon serious thinking in philosophy, theology, psychology, and other areas which have been affected by Freud studies.”—International Philosophical Quarterly
“A stimulating tour de force that allows us to envisage both the psychoanalytic body of knowledge and the psychoanalytic movement in a broad perspective within the framework of its links to culture, history and the evolution of Western intellectual thought.” – Psychoanalytic Quarterly
Paul Ricoeur is a professor of philosophy at the University of Chicago and the University of Paris.

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Inhoudsopgave

Recollection of Meaning 28 Interpretation as Exer
32
course of Reflection to Symbols 42 Reflection
54
ENERGETICS AND HERMENEUTICS
65
The Constancy Principle and the Quantitative Appa
71
ratus 71 Toward the Topography
82
The DreamWork and the Work of Exegesis 88
102
Instinct and Idea in the Papers
115
THE INTERPRETATION OF CULTURE
153
Freudian Speculation on Life and Death 281
302
Interrogations
310
What is Negativity? 311 Pleasure and Satisfaction
324
Between Psychology
344
Psychoanalysis is not an Observational Science 358
358
The Phenomenological Approach to the Psycho
375
analytic Field 375 Psychoanalysis is not Phenomen
390
Archeology and Teleology
459

The Analogy of Dreams
159
From the Oneiric to the Sublime
178
tation 180 The Genetic Ways of Interpretation 186
186
The Notion of
211
Illusion
230
Illusion and the Strategy of Desire 231 The Genetic
236
236 The Economic Function of Religion
247
EROS THANTOS ANANKE
261
The Reality Principle and ObjectChoice 270
276
ian Phenomenology 462 The Unsurpassable Charac
477
The Question
483
The Approaches to Symbol
494
The Overdetermination of Symbols 496 The Hier
514
The Ambiguity
524
the Sacred 524 The Value and Limits of a Psycho
531
Index
553
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Over de auteur (1970)

Professor of philosophy at the University of Paris and the University of Chicago, Paul Ricoeur has been described as "possibly the only younger philosopher in Europe whose reputation is of the magnitude of that of the old men of Existentialism---Marcel, Jaspers, Heidegger and Sartre . . . ." His work has been characterized as "the most massive accomplishment of any philosopher of Christian faith since the appearance of Gabriel Marcel." A practitioner of the phenomenology of Edmund Husserl mediated by a return to Immanuel Kant---in that things in themselves, though unknowable, are not excluded by bracketing existence but are acknowledged as the necessary conditions for the possibility of human experience---Ricoeur has examined those parts of experience---faulty, fallible, and susceptible to error and evil---that other phenomenologists, interested primarily in the cognitional, have neglected. In this respect he follows in the footsteps of Heidegger and Sartre, but he goes beyond them in his discovery of principles transcending human subjectivity that are amenable to spiritual interpretation. Here Ricoeur steps within the contemporary hermeneutic circle of Heidegger and Hans-Georg Gadamer, on whom he has written. Ricoeur's hermeneutical method, however, has much in common with the methods of biblical exegesis, and in this respect his works should be especially appealing to seminarians and the clergy.

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