Nightmover: How Aldrich Ames Sold the CIA to the KGB for $4.6 Million

Voorkant
HarperCollins Publishers, 1996 - 368 pagina's
0 Recensies
Reviews worden niet geverifieerd, maar Google checkt wel op nepcontent en verwijdert zulke content als die wordt gevonden.
The #1 bestselling author of Molehunt and The Spy Who Got Away--America's most acclaimed espionage expert--tells the inside story of the explosive Aldrich Ames spy case, revealing the identities, CIA code names, and the tragic story of each of Aldrich Ames's victims, as well as the dramatic story of the secret mole-hunt team. Photos.

Vanuit het boek

Wat mensen zeggen - Een review schrijven

Reviews worden niet geverifieerd, maar Google checkt wel op nepcontent en verwijdert zulke content als die wordt gevonden.

LibraryThing Review

Gebruikersrecensie  - SalemAthenaeum - LibraryThing

The #1 bestselling author of Molehunt and The Spy Who Got Away--America's most acclaimed espionage expert--tells the inside story of the explosive Aldrich Ames spy case, revealing the identities, CIA ... Volledige review lezen

Nightmover: how Aldrich Ames sold the CIA to the KGB for $4. 6 million

Gebruikersrecensie  - Not Available - Book Verdict

The author of The Invisible Government (1974), an authoritative study of the CIA, investigates the spy who almost put us out in the cold. Volledige review lezen

Inhoudsopgave

CAUGHT
1
IGOR
6
ROSARIO
21
Copyright

22 andere gedeelten niet getoond

Overige edities - Alles bekijken

Veelvoorkomende woorden en zinsdelen

Over de auteur (1996)

David Wise was born in Manhattan, New York on May 10, 1930. While attending Columbia College, he worked as a campus stringer for The New York Herald Tribune. He joined the Herald Tribune's staff in 1951 and later moved to Washington, where he covered politics and the Kennedy White House. He was named Washington bureau chief in 1963 and served in that role until the paper closed in 1966. He wrote several books with Thomas B. Ross including The U-2 Affair and The Invisible Government. His other nonfiction books included The Seven Million Dollar Spy and The Politics of Lying: Government Deception, Secrecy, and Power, which won a George Polk Award. He also wrote three spy novels including The Children's Game. He contributed to numerous magazines including Vanity Fair, The New York Times Magazine, Esquire, The New Republic, and Smithsonian. He was also an intelligence and national security commentator on CNN for six years. He died from pancreatic cancer on October 8, 2018 at the age of 88.

Bibliografische gegevens