Speech Acts: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language

Voorkant
'This small but tightly packed volume is easily the most substantial discussion of speech acts since John Austin's How To Do Things With Words and one of the most important contributions to the philosophy of language in recent decades.'--Philosophical Quarterly
 

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Inhoudsopgave

Methods and scope
3
2 Linguistic characterizations
4
3 The verification of linguistic characterizations
12
4 Why study speech acts?
16
5 The principle of expressibility
19
Expressions meaning and speech acts
22
2 Predication
26
4 Propositions
29
Prediction
97
2 Nominalism and the existence of universals
103
3 Ontological commitments
106
4 The term theory of propositions
113
5 Predicates and universals
119
6 Is predication a speech act?
121
7 Rules of predication
123
SOME APPLICATIONS OF THE THEORY
129

5 Rules
33
6 Meaning
42
7 The distinction between brute and institutional facts
50
The structure of illocutionary acts
54
a complicated way
57
2 Insincere promises
62
4 Extending the analysis
64
Reference as a speech act
72
1 Use and mention
73
2 Axioms of reference
77
3 Kinds of definite referring expressions
81
5 The principle of identification
85
6 Qualifications to the principle of identification
88
7 Some consequences of the principle of identification
91
8 Rules of reference
94
Three fallacies in contemporary philosophy
131
1 The naturalistic fallacy fallacy
132
2 The speech act fallacy
136
3 The assertion fallacy
141
meaning as use
146
5 Alternative explanations
149
Problems of reference
157
2 Proper names
162
Deriving ought from is
175
1 How to do it
177
2 The nature of the issues involved
182
3 Objections and replies
188
Index
199
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