A Pictorial History of Greece, Ancient and Modern

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Sorin & Ball and Samuel Agnew, 1847 - 363 pagina's
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Inhoudsopgave

Theseus continued
27
Theseus continued
29
Theseus continued
30
The Trojan War
32
The Trojan War continued
33
The Heraclidae
35
Codrus Greek Colonies
36
Institution of the Olympic Festival
38
Games continued
41
Grecian Mythology Classification Jupiter
44
Apollo Mars Mercury
47
Bacchus
49
Vulcan
51
Juno Minerva
53
Venus and Cupid
56
Diana Ceres and Westa
58
Marine Gods Neptune Triton oceanus and Nereus
62
The infernal deities Pluto Plutus and Somnus
65
The terrestrial gods and goddesses
67
Aurora
69
The more ancient gods
74
Nymphs Satyrs etc
76
The Muses Graces and Sirens
77
Furies Fates Harpies Lares and Manes
80
Demigods and Heroes
82
Esculapius etc
87
Generi view of Grecian M hology
90
Future stateRewards and punishments
91
Religious RitesTemplesPriests
93
Oracles
95
The Amphictyonic Council
97
Poetry I Homer
98
Poetry of GreeceHomerHesiod
100
Political condition of GreeceLycurgus
103
Lycurgus continued
105
Lycurgus establishes his Code
107
Code of Lycurgus continued
109
System of Lycurgus continued His death
113
The Messenian Wars
116
Troubles in Athens Dracos Code
119
Solons Reform
120
Solons Code continued
122
Solons Travels
124
Solons return Usurpation of Pisistratus
126
Hippias and Hipparchus
128
Manners and customs of the ancient Greeks Dress
130
The women
131
Classes occupations amusements meals education
133
marriages funerals
135
Armies Warfare Fortified towns
136
Greek ships of war Houses furniture c
140
Poets of the Second Period
144
Sages and philosophers of the Second Period The seven wise men
147
The seven wise men continued
148
The seven wise men continued
151
Philosophers Anaximander Pythagoras
153
The contest at sea
178
A large portion of Greece devastated by the Persians
180
Battle of Salamis
183
Retreat of the Persians
187
Dishonesty of Themistocles
188
Battle of Plataea End of the war
190
Fortifying of Athens
193
Themistocles
196
Cimon Splendor of Athens
199
Rebellion of Spartan Helots Rise of Pericles
201
Ascendancy of Pericles
204
Power of Pericles Athens at war with Corinth
206
Commencement of the Peloponnesian war Accusatio and death of Pericles
209
CleonNiciasAlcibiades
212
Discord at Athens Recall of Alcibiades His second disgrace His death
219
Origin of the Drama Dramatists of the Third Period
222
Dramatists continued
225
foes and Historians of the Third Period 22
228
Philosophers of the Third Period
230
Socrates e e
233
Arts Artists of the Third Period
241
P E R I O d I W From the capture of Athens by the Lacedaemonians 404 B C till the subju gation of Greece by the Romans i46 B C
244
Cyrus Artaxerxes Retreat of the ten thousand Greeks
246
Agesilaus War with Persia
252
Efforts of Conon in behalf of Athens
254
The Olynthian War
257
Epaminondas
261
Battle of Leuctra Jason of Pherae
264
Invasion of Laconia
268
Alliance of Athens and Arcadia
272
Olympic Festival Death of Epaminondas
273
Philip of Macedon
278
Athens The social war
280
Lá taken º Philip His marriage
282
Proceedings of the Amphictyons Phocian or Sacred War begun Phocians routed by Philip
284
CWI Thermopylae closed against Philip femºthenes the Orator 2
288
Attack on º by Philip Fall of Olynthus
292
Athenian embassy to Pella Macedon made an Am phictyonic state
295
Cessation of war in Greece
297
Capture of Elatea Battle of Chaeronea 30
301
Faſlof Grecian independence Assassination of Philip His character
304
Accession of Alexander
308
Invasion of Asia by Alexander Victory at the Gran icus
311
The Gordian knot Preparations of Darius
315
Battle of the Issus and Sidon Siege of Tyre
319
Alexander in Egypt Defeat of Darius
324
cxvilBayºn and Persepolis Death of Darius Alexan er in Scythia
329
Domestic affairs of Athens Invasion of India by Alexander
332
The illness and death of Alexander His character
336
Kingdom of Egypt Syria c founded Recall of exiles to Athens Death of Demosthenes
338
Death of Antipater and Phocion
341
Rome fall of Greece
343
Writers of the Fourth Period
345
Historians Orators c of the Fourth Period
346
Philosophers Sophists and Artists of the Fourth Period
352

Overige edities - Alles weergeven

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Populaire passages

Pagina 83 - God, the immortality of the soul, and a future state of rewards and punishments have been esteemed useful engines of government.
Pagina 359 - They fought— like brave men, long and well; They piled that ground with Moslem slain: They conquered— but Bozzaris fell, Bleeding at every vein. His few surviving comrades saw His smile when rang their proud hurrah, And the red field was won; Then saw in death his eyelids close Calmly, as to a night's repose. Like flowers at set of sun.
Pagina 69 - There is a Power whose care Teaches thy way along that pathless coast, The desert and illimitable air, Lone wandering, but not lost.
Pagina 52 - O'er her broad shoulders hangs his horrid shield, Dire, black, tremendous ! Round the margin roll'd, A fringe of serpents hissing guards the gold : Here all the terrors of grim War appear, Here rages Force, here tremble Flight and Fear, Here storm'd Contention, and here Fury frown'd, And the dire orb portentous Gorgon crown'd.
Pagina 62 - THOU, of all creation blest, Sweet insect ! that delight'st to rest Upon the wild wood's leafy tops, To drink the dew that morning drops, And chirp thy song with such a glee, That happiest kings may envy thee ! Whatever decks the velvet field, Whate'er the circling seasons yield, Whatever buds, whatever blows, For thee it buds, for thee it grows. Nor yet art thou the peasant's fear, To him thy friendly notes are dear ; For...
Pagina 51 - Of sounding brass ; the polish'd axle, steel. Eight brazen spokes in radiant order flame; The circles gold, of uncorrupted frame, Such as the heavens produce : and round the gold Two brazen rings of work divine were roll'd. The bossy naves of solid silver shone; Braces of gold suspend the moving throne : The car, behind, an arching figure bore ; The bending concave form'd an arch before. Silver the beam, the' extended yoke was gold, And golden reins the
Pagina 275 - Know that a son is born to us. We thank the gods, not so much for their gift, as for bestowing it at a time when Aristotle lives. We assure ourselves that you will form him a prince, worthy of his father, and worthy of Macedon.
Pagina 231 - Socrates was to drink the poison. His family and friends assembled early, to spend the last hours with him. Xanthippe, his wife, was much affected, and showed her grief by loud cries. Socrates made a sign to Crito to have her removed, as he wished to spend his last moments in tranquillity. He then talked with his friends first about his poem, then concerning suicide, and lastly concerning the immortality of the soul.
Pagina 53 - Venus bewailed his death with much sorrow, and changed his blood, which was shed on the ground, into the flower anemone.
Pagina 30 - ... that the Greeks constructed a wooden horse of prodigious size, in the body of which they concealed a number of armed men, and then retired towards the sea-shore, to induce the enemy to believe that the besiegers had given up the enterprise, and were about to return home. Deceived by this manoeuvre, the Trojans brought the gigantic horse into the city, and the men who had been concealed within it, stealing out in the night-time, unbarred the gates, and admitted the Grecian army within the walls....

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