Charles I of Anjou: Power, Kingship and State-Making in Thirteenth-Century Europe

Voorkant
Routledge, 16 jul. 2014 - 264 pagina's
Charles I of Anjou (1225-85), brother of St Louis, was one of the most controversial figures of thirteenth-century Europe. A royal adventurer, who carved out a huge Mediterranean power block, as ruler of Provence, Jerusalem and the kingdom of Naples as well as Anjou, he changed for good the political configuration of the Mediterranean world - even though his ambitions were fatally undermined by the revolt of the Sicilian Vespers. Jean Dunbabin's study - the first in English for 40 years - reassesses Charles's extraordinary career, his pivotal role in the crusades and in military reform, trading, diplomacy, learning and the arts, and finds a more remarkable figure than the ruthless thug of conventional historiography.
 

Wat mensen zeggen - Een review schrijven

We hebben geen reviews gevonden op de gebruikelijke plaatsen.

Inhoudsopgave

The Dominions
25
Policies
127
Court Life and Culture
179
Bibliography
233
The Mediterranean in the thirteenth century
241
The French royal family in the thirteenth century
244
Index
245
Copyright

Overige edities - Alles weergeven

Veelvoorkomende woorden en zinsdelen

Bibliografische gegevens