Pagina-afbeeldingen
PDF
ePub

NARRATIVE

OF THE

LIFE AND TRAVELS

OF

SERJE ANT B-

WRITTEN BY HIMSELF.

« Call upon me in the day of trouble, I will deliver thee, and thou shalt

glorify me."
“I shall not die, but live, and declare the works of the Lord.”

EDINBURGH:

PRINTED FOR DAVID BROWN,

16, SOUTH ST. ANDREW'S STREET ;

CHALMERS AND COLLINS, GLASGOW ;
KNIGHT & LACEY, 24, PATERNOSTER-ROW,

LONDON,

DS 412 .B976

Printed by Balfour and Clarke,

Edinburgh, 1823.

ADVERTISEMENT.

In justice to the unpretending, Author of this volume, it is necessary to notice that the idea of publishing it in no respect originated with himself. The circumstances which led to its appearance may be very briefly stated,

On the Serjeant's arrival in this country from India, he found himself surrounded by an extensive circle of relations, to which the excellence of his own character soon added many personal friends. Aş might be expected, the occurrences of his past life

and travels, frequently formed the topics of conversation at their occasional meetings; and as he had from an early period, for his own amusement and edification, been in the habit of keeping an exact journal of all “the providences that befel him,” he frequently had recourse to it for the purpose of aiding his recollection, and exhibiting more vividly the state of his feelings at various periods, and under the various incidents of his life. Many passages of the Journal excited a very pleasing and deep interest in those to whom they were communicated, and the desire of

perusing it gradually extended itself to persons in a higher condition of life. A clergyman particularly, under whose pastoral care he was for some time placed, was so much struck with the interesting, as well as the instructive

character of these “simple annals,” that he urged the Author, in a very kind but pressing manner, to collect the more material passages in the original Journal into something like a continued narrative; and to transcribe them in a connected and legible form, for the private enjoymentof his particular friends. Our Author, to whom nothing. is more agreeable than to have his mind or hands usefully. occupied, undertook the task, and executed it with a degree of neatness, which would have done great credit to a more practised scribe. The manuscript volume was, of course, in very great re.. quest in his own neighbourhood, and was perused by none without peculiar pleasure; but, for several years, no idea of printing it presented itself to his own mind, though it was frequently

« VorigeDoorgaan »