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the first that entered the trenches; and for that reason had the honor to be the first messenger of this happy news to the Emperor.

ib. And choke Tibiscus with the slain ;] This battle was fought on the 10th of October, 1697, where Prince Eugene commanded in chief. There never happened so great and so terrible a destruction to the Ottoman army as this, which fell upon the principal commanders more than the common soldiers: for not fewer than fifteen Bassas (five of whom' had been Viziers of the bench) were killed, besides the su.

preme Vizier.

115. Beneath fair Ulysippo's walls,] The old name of Lisbon, said to have been founded by Ulysses.

ib. Or, sent in Aetna's fiery cave to groan,] The mountain under which Jupiter lodged Enceladus.

ODE XXV. Page 116. The Author of this Ode was by maternal descent grandson of Mr. Stavely, author of “ The “ Roman Horseleech, &c.” He received the rudiments of literature at Westminster, and was at one, if not both the Universities, but without going through the stated course of study. Having obtained a place in the office of ordnance, he generally resided within the Tower, and there died about the year 1749.

117. See thy friend, Godolphin stand!) Sydney Earl of Godolphin, Lord Treasurer of England, who died September 15, 1712.

the first that entered the trenches; and for that reason had the honor to be the first messenger of this happy news to the Emperor.

ib. And choke Tibiscus with the slain ;] This battle was fought on the 10th of October, 1697, where Prince Eugene commanded in chief. There never happened so great and so terrible a destruction to the Ottoman army as this, which fell upon the principal commanders more than the common soldiers: for not fewer than fifteen Bassas (five of whon' had been Viziers of the bench) were killed, besides the su

preme Vizier.

115. Beneath fair Ulysippo's walls,] The old name of Lisbon, said to have been founded by Ulysses.

ib. Or, sent in Aetna's fiery cave to groan,] The mountain under which Jupiter lodged Enceladus.

ODE XXV. Page 116. The Author of this Ode was by maternal descent grandson of Mr. Stavely, author of “ The “ Roman Horseleech, &c.” He received the rudi. ments of literature at Westminster, . 'was at one, if not both the Universities, but win. ing through the stated course, study. H ined a place in the officer: ance, he go

td within the Tower,

died abi

1749. 119.

Gudolpl

. Sydney E

in, I Jand, who

--of Eng.

verit

ODE XXVI.

Page 119. Mr. West, son to the Chancellor of Ireland of that name, and grandson to Bishop Burnet, was the intimate friend of Gray and Horace Walpole, now earl of Orford. Having received his education at Eton and Christ-Church, he looked forward a while to the profession of the Law, but at length declined the pursuit, partly from dislike, and partly from ill health. He died at Pope's, in the parish of Hatfield, of a consumption, June 1, 1742, in the 26th year of his age. His friend Gray, in both Latin and English, has pathetically lamented his loss.

120. Sweet Bard of Merlin's cave ! ] Stephen Duck, the thresher, whom the Queen had appointed keeper of Merlin's cave in Richmond Park.

ODE XXVII.

Page 125. The Right Hon. Henry Pelham, brother to the duke of Newcastle, was at the time of his death, first commissioner, chancellor, and under treasurer of the Exchequer. 127. The same sab morn to church and state,

(So far our sins 'twas fix'd by fate)

A double stroke was giv'n ;] The 6th of March, 1754, was remarkable for the publication of the philosophical works of Lord Boling. broke, and the death of Mr. Pelham.

ib.

ODE XXVIII. Page 131. Or wrapt in solemn thought, and pleasing wo,] This alludes to Mr. Gray's Elegy written in a country church-yard.

But soon with bolder note, and wilder flight,] The Bard, a Pindaric Ode.

ib. Now led by playful Fancy's hand] The Progress of Poetry, a Pindaric Ode.

132. O guardian Angel of our early day,] Ode on a distant prospect of Eton College.

ib. Ye Fiends who rankle in the human heart,] Hymn to Adversity.

ODE XXXII. Page 146. Sir Charles Hanbury Williams, second son of John Hanbury, Esq. a South-Sea Director, was in 1735 elected member for the county of Monmouth, and re-chosen in 1739, on being appointed paymaster of the marines, and at the general election in 1741. On the 20th of October, 1744, he was in. stalled a Knight of the Bath, and in 1746 appointed minister to the court of Berlin. In that situation he remained until the gth of May, 1749, when he was named envoy extraordinary and plenipotentiary to the same court. In 1754 he represented the borough of Leominster, and about that time went ambassador to the court of Russia. He acquitted himself in his several employments abroad with considerable abili.

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