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"Let him shun castles ;
Safer shall he be upon the sandy plains

Than where castles mounted stand,'-
i.e. the representation of a castle mounted for a sign.” THEOBALD.

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P. 196. (213)

our present part." The folio has “our present parts." — Earlier in this scene, Young Clifford speaks of “the frozen bosoms of our part” (i. e. party).

P. 196. (214)

old Salisbury," So Mr. Collier's Ms. Corrector.—The folio has “Of Salsbury.”—In the corresponding speech of the original play York asks, “But did you see old Salsbury," &c.; and we have already had “Old Salisbury,” p. 191.

P. 196. (215) Aged contusions and all brush of time,

And, like a gallant in the brow of youth," Here Mr. Collier's Ms. Corrector alters "brush" to "bruise" (Warburton's reading), and "brow" to "bloom.”—For "brow" (which, according to Steevens, is equivalent to "height") Johnson proposed “blow."--(In support of the alterations " bruise" and "bloom" Mr. W. N. Lettsom cites

“And, with gray hairs and bruise of many days,

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His May of youth and bloom of lustihood."

Much Ado about Nothing, act v. sc. 1.).

P. 197. (216) “Now, by my faith," “The first folio reads "Now by my hand.' This undoubtedly was one of the many alterations made by the editors of that copy, to avoid the penalty of the Stat. 3 Jac. I. c. 21. The true reading I have restored from the old play.” MALONE,—who is followed by the Cambridge Editors.--Mr. Collier defends (but weakly, I think) the lection of the folio.

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P. 197. (217)

"Sound drums and trumpets, So the original play.-Here the folio has “Sound Drumme and Trumpets ;'' but in The Third Part of Henry VI. act i. sc. 1, it has "Sound Drummes and Trumpets."

P. 197. (218)

"these" Altered by Hanmer to "this.”

THE THIRD PART OF

KING HENRY THE SIXTH.

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THE THIRD PART OF KING HENRY VI.

First printed in the folio of 1623.-An alteration by Shakespeare of a drama entitled The true Tragedie of Richard Duke of Yorke, and the death of good King Henrie the Sixt, with the whole contention betweene the two Houses Lancaster and Yorke, as it was sundrie times acted by the Right Honourable the Earle of Pembrooke his seruants, - originally printed in 1595, 8vo (reprinted for the Shakespeare Society in 1843).

See Introduction to The First Part of King Henry VI. p. 3 of this volume. DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.

his

sons.

KING HENRY the Sixth.
EDWARD, prince of Wales, his son.
Louis XI. king of France.
DUKE OF SOMERSET.
DUKE OF EXETER.
EARL OF OXFORD.
EARL OF NORTHUMBERLAND.
EARL OF WESTMORELAND.
LORD CLIFFORD.
RICHARD PLANTAGENET, duke of York.
EDWARD, earl of March, afterwards King Edward IV.,
EDMUND, earl of Rutland,
GEORGE, afterwards duke of Clarence,
RICHARD, afterwards duke of Gloster,
DUKE OF NORFOLK.
MARQUESS OF MONTAGUE.
EARL OF WARWICK.
EARL OF PEMBROKE.
LORD HASTINGS.
LORD STAFFORD.
SIR JOHN MORTIMER,
Sir Hugh MORTIMER,

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uncles to the Duke of York,
HENRY, earl of Richmond, a youth.
LORD RIVERS, brother to Lady Grey.
SIR WILLIAM STANLEY.
SIR JOHN MONTGOMERY.
SIR JOHN SOMERVILLE.
Tutor to Rutland. Mayor of York.
Lieutenant of the Tower. A Nobleman.
Two Keepers. A Huntsman.
A Son that has killed his father.
A Father that has killed his son.

QUEEN MARGARET.
LADY GREY, afterwards Queen to Edward IV.
BONA, sister to the French Queen.

Soldiers, Attendants, Messengers, Watchmen, &c.

SCENE—During part of the third act in France; during the rest of

the play in England.

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