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L

PAGE.
Lamb, a modern diet
Landlord, the difference between a landlord and an incum-
bent

265
Lawgiver, the instruction of a lawgiver, in relation to un.
married women

332
Letter to Isaac Bickerstaff from a Well-wisher

13
. . . . From one who designs to be an adventurer in the
lottery

57
.. From John Hammond upon the recovery of his
watch

58
From a fortune-hunter

72
To Mopsa in Sheer-Lane

ibid.
From Statira

74
From Strephon

128
From Dorothy Drumstick

129
From Lydia

130
From Chloe

131
About whetters

133
From his valentine

134
From kinsman in behalf of Ch les Bubbleboy 137
From a young gentleman in Cornhill

152
From one upon wedlock

171
From Nic. Humdrum

191
From the upholsterer

225
From Isabella Kit

226, 263
From Tom Folio

227
From his cousin Frank Bickerstaff

267
From I. B.
From T. S. out of Cornwall

308
From Sylvia

336
About a green-house

348
From a yeoman of Kent

349
From Mr. Bickerstaff to Cloe

131
To his brother

141
From Pliny to Calphurnia

169
From Cicero to Terentia

218
From a corporal to his wife

245
Levity, her Post

36
Liberty, its region described

229
Love, the effects of disappointments in it

337
Lovemore, a happy husband

174
Lovers (the band of)

33
Lucretia, her story

20
Lust, in whom virtuous love

32

Lute, the part it bears in a concert or conversation

Where to be found

With what other instrument matched
Lydia, a coquet, her character

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M

59

a

349

Machiavel, his office

50
Author of a mischievous sect

342
Madmen, who
whither sent by the Romans

60
Mr. Bickerstaff's intended edifice for their re-
ception and cure

61
The first symptom of madness

288
Maids of honour, their allowance of beef for their breakfast
in Queen Elizabeth's time

162
Marriage, an account of it in a letter to Mr, Bickerstaff 171
A table of marriage

212
by whom ridiculed

217
some reasons for the misfortunes accompany-
ing it
Marrow-bone and cleaver, a modern musical instrument 189
Matchlock, a member of the club at the trumpet in Sheer-
Lane

92
Mechanicks in learning

285
Microscopes, their use

29
Minucio, his character

275
his spirit of contradiction

ibid.
Minute philosopher, who

105
Mirtillo, the ogler, his interview with Flavia at an opera 151
Mite, a dissection of one
Modely (Tom) his knowledge of the fashion

251
head of the order of insipids

ibid.
Monarchy, the genius of it described in the region of liberty 229
Mopsa, her good fortune in the lottery prognosticated by

Mr. Bickerstaff
A letter to her

• 72
Mourning, a proper dress for a beautiful lady

176

30

56

N
Nature, its prevalency
Nicolini, his excellencies on the stage
Northern parts fruitful in bagpipes
Notch (Sir Jeoffrey) a member of Mr. Bickerstaff's club
Novelists, the effect of their writings

277

9
189
91

303

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P
Parsimony, a favourite in the Temple of Avarice
Partridge (John) his letter to Mr. Bickerstaff

his symptoms of resuscitation
Pasquin, his letters to Mr. Bickerstaff

an account of him to prevent mistakes
Passing-bells, who so called
Passion, the surprize of it fatal

a tragical instance of it
Peasants, who properly so
Pedants, their several classes
Pedantry, compared to hypocrisy
Persecution, an attendant on Tyranny
Petitions to Mr. Bickerstaff from Job Chanticleer

from Deborah Hark, and others
from the parish of Goatham
from Sarah Lately

and Isabella Kit
Petticoat, its cause tried

how long to be worn
Philosophy, the excellence of it
Platonists, their opinion
Plenty, a goddess in the region of liberty
Pliny, his compliment, and advice to Trajan
Pluto, his palace and throne
Politicians incapable of reproof
Pope sick of the tooth-ach

his modesty overcome
Post-man, his extraordinary talent
Poverty, a terrible spectre in the Temple of Avarice
Powell (Mr.) his disingenuity
Present of wine to Mr. Bickerstaff
Pretenders to poetry a kind of madmen
Pride an instance of it in a Cobler on Ludgate-Hill

its cause, and consequence
makes men odious
creates envy

51
24
25
77
84
189
279
280
265
215
246
230
101
112
135
262

263
14 to 18

43
269
196
231

81
203
120
79
80
304
53
10
160
287

67
68, 69

340
841

.

PAGE.
Pride, found only in narrow souls

342
Prim (Penelope) her petition

26
Prude distinguished from a coquet

64
bears the part of a virginal in a female concert 209
Prudence in woman, the same as with wisdom in a man 277
Punch, rival to Nicolini

10
his ill-manners to Mr. Bickerstaff

11
.. his original

ibid.
Puppets in M. Powell's show from whence taken

ibid.
Puzzlepost (Ned) how he came to be improved in writing 138

a

Q
Quality, its weaknesses
Quixote (Don) the first symptoms of his madness

314
302

R
Ragout, prejudicial to the stomach
Rapin, his observations upon the English theatre
Rapine, an attendant on licentiousness
Read (Sir William) an eminent oculist
Reading, the exercise of the mind
Regulus, a great instance of a public spirit
Religious war
Reptile (Dick) a member of a club in Sheer-lane

his character

and reflection on the abuse of speech
Keputation, how established
Romans, an instance of their generous virtue
Ruffs, wherein necessary

163
102
232
152
158
330
200

92
ibid,
113
341
45

27

recommended to be worn with the fardinga!
Rural Wits, hunting horns in a male concert

ibid.
188

s
Scævola, his great fortitude
Scandal, the universal thirst after it
Scotus, his way of distinguishing mankind
Seneca, his moderation in his fortune
Sex in souls
Sirallow (Sir Timothy) customer to Charles Bubbleboy
Sheep-biters, why a term of reproach
Silence, significant on many occasions

instances of it
Sippet (Harry) an expert wine-brewer
Snuff-boxes, a new edition of them

300
242
286
269
278
140
162
95
96
89
141

.

PAGE.
Socrates, his behaviour in the Athenian theatre

47
the doctrines he laboured; to inculcate into the
mind of the ancients

104
Softly (Ned) a very pretty poet

238
his sonnet

239
Speech, the abuse of it

113.
Stage, or Theatre, the conveniences of it

324
Statira, her letter to Mr. Bickerstaff

74.
Stocking, the custom of throwing it at a wedding

333
Story-tellers, the bag-pipes in conversation

189
their employment in Mr. Bickerstaff's Bedlam 288
Swearing, a folly without any temptation

114

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T
Tale-bearers, the use of them in Mr. Bickerstaff's Bedlam 291
Tea, not used in Queen Elizabeth's days

162
Temple of Hymen

35
of Lust

36
of Virtue

48
of Honour

ibid.
of Vanity

49
of Avarice

51
Timoleon, his discourse at the Grecian,

273
Tintoret (Tom) a great master in the art of colouring 89
Instances of it

ibid.
Tiresias, his advice to Ulysses

181
Tittle (Sir Timothy) a profound critic

248
his indignation and discourse with
his mistress

249
Toasts, a new religious order in England

79
Tories, a new religious order in England

ibid.
Toys, by whom brought first iuto fashion

137
Trumpet, what sort of men are the trumpets in conversation 187
where to be found

190
Tyranny commands an army against the region of liberty 232
Tweazer-cases, the best, where to be bought

138

V & U
Varnish (Tom) his adventure
Veal, a modern diet
Vicissitude of human life
Violins, who in conversation

where to be found

with what other instrument matched
Virginal, an instrument in a female concert

110
162
269
188
190
212
209

a

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