Into the Mouths of Babes: An Anthology of Children's Abolitionist Literature

Voorkant
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2005 - 390 pagina's


While most people know that Harriet Beecher Stowe's famous book Uncle Tom's Cabin spurred on abolotionist sentiments in the North, not many are aware of the vast abolitionist literature of children's books, poems, short stories, and essays. Many of these volumes were not written by seasoned authors, but by women whose primary roles were as mothers who functioned as domestic abolitionists, and have been lost to the ages. Here, De Rosa recovers a collection of these writings, illustrating the domestic abolitionists' efforts

While most people know that Harriet Beecher Stowe's famous book Uncle Tom's Cabin spurred on abolitionist sentiments in the North, not many are aware of the fast abolitionist literature of children's books, poems, short stories, and essays. Many of these volumes were written by domestic women, not seasoned authors, and have been lost to the ages. Here, De Rosa recovers a collection of these writings, illustrating the domestic abolitionists' efforts when cultural imperatives demanded women's silence. These women asserted their anti-slavery sentiments through the voices of victims (slave children and mothers), white mother-historians, and abolitionist children in juvenile literature, one of the few genres available to female authors of the period. This collection restores the voices of these little known authors and shows how their voices helped to influence children and adults of the period.

For women struggling to find a voice in the abolitionist movement while maintaining the codes of gender and respectability, writing children's literature was an acceptable strategy to counteract the opposition. By seizing the opportunity to write abolitionist juvenile literature, domestic abolitionists maintained their identities as exemplary mother-educators, preserved their claims to femininity, and simultaneously entered the public arena. By adapting literary strategies popular in nineteenth-century juvenile narratives, domestic novels, and slave narratives to document slavery's violation of religious, economic, and political principles, these women spoke out against and institution that stood in marked contrast to the beliefs they held so dear. This anthology aims to fill the important gap in our understanding of women's literary productions about race and gender and illustrates the limitations of a canon that excludes such voices.

 

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Inhoudsopgave

V
1
VI
4
VII
13
VIII
16
XII
17
XIII
19
XIV
21
XV
24
LXIV
175
LXVI
179
LXVII
185
LXVIII
187
LXIX
189
LXXI
195
LXXIII
198
LXXIV
200

XVI
25
XVII
26
XVIII
27
XIX
28
XX
29
XXI
30
XXII
33
XXIII
38
XXV
44
XXVI
47
XXVIII
48
XXX
49
XXXIV
50
XXXV
52
XXXVI
53
XXXVII
54
XXXVIII
57
XLI
58
XLII
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XLIII
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XLV
69
XLVI
71
XLVII
73
XLVIII
77
L
81
LI
83
LII
86
LIII
97
LV
101
LVI
104
LVII
110
LVIII
118
LIX
142
LX
159
LXI
161
LXII
165
LXIII
171
LXXV
203
LXXVI
207
LXXVIII
209
LXXXIII
211
LXXXIV
215
LXXXV
217
LXXXVII
226
LXXXVIII
231
LXXXIX
233
XCI
239
XCII
243
XCIII
249
XCIV
251
XCV
260
XCVI
263
XCVII
266
XCIX
268
C
271
CI
272
CII
274
CIII
276
CV
278
CVI
280
CVII
283
CVIII
285
CX
305
CXI
307
CXIV
313
CXV
315
CXVI
318
CXVII
322
CXVIII
335
CXIX
369
CXXI
371
CXXII
381
Copyright

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Over de auteur (2005)

Deborah C. De Rosa is Associate Professor of English at Northern Illinois University. She is the author of Domestic Abolitionism and Juvenile Literature: 1830-1865 (2003) in addition to book chapters and journal articles.

Bibliografische gegevens