A Manual of Chemistry: Containing the Principal Facts of the Science, in the Order in which They are Discussed, and Illustrated in the Lectures at Harvard University, N.E. ... : Compiled and Arranged as a Text Book : for the Use of Students, and Persons Attending Lectures on Chemistry

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Marsh, Capen, Lyon and Webb, 1839 - 556 pagina's
 

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Pagina 567 - THE BORROWER WILL BE CHARGED AN OVERDUE FEE IF THIS BOOK 18 NOT RETURNED TO THE LIBRARY ON OR BEFORE THE LAST DATE STAMPED BELOW. NON-RECEIPT OF OVERDUE NOTICES DOES NOT EXEMPT THE BORROWER FROM OVERDUE FEES. I...
Pagina 338 - ... are sufficient to produce the full effect, in the shade several hours are required, and light transmitted through different coloured glasses acts upon it with different degrees of intensity. Thus it is found that red rays, or the common sunbeams passed through red glass, have very little action upon it ; yellow and green are more efficacious, but blue and violet light produce the most decided and powerful effects.
Pagina 89 - TT: but in front, as in fig. 1, there is an interstice between the mass of tin connecting the ten copper sheets, and that connecting the ten zinc sheets. The screw forceps, appertaining to each of the tin masses, may be seen on either side of the interstice: and likewise a wire for ignition held between them. The application of the rope, pulley, and weights, is obvious. The swivel at S permits the frame to be swung round and lowered into water in the vessel a, to wash off the acid, which, after immersion...
Pagina 183 - A striking example is its power of decomposing water by the action of light, or at a red heat; and most compound substances, of which hydrogen is an element, are deprived of that principle, and therefore decomposed in like manner.
Pagina 229 - There was a violent effervescence at the upper surface ; at the lower, or negative surface, there was no liberation of elastic fluid ; but small globules having a high metallic lustre, and being precisely similar in visible characters to quicksilver, appeared, some of which burnt with explosion and bright flame, as soon as they were formed, and others remained, and were merely tarnished, and finally covered by a white film which formed on their surfaces.
Pagina 269 - The protoxide is of an ash-gray color, and is the basis of the salts of cobalt, most of which are of a pink hue. When heated to redness in open vessels, it absorbs oxygen, and is converted into the peroxide. It may be prepared by decomposing the carbonate of cobalt by heat, in a vessel from which the atmospheric air is excluded.
Pagina 201 - Iodide of nitrogen. From the weak affinity that exists between iodine and nitrogen, these substances cannot be made to unite directly. But when iodine is put into a solution of ammonia, the alkali is decomposed ; its elements unite with different portions of iodine, and thus cause the formation of hydriodic acid and iodide of nitrogen. The latter subsides in the form of a dark powder, which is characterised, like the chloride of nitrogen, by its explosive property.
Pagina 78 - ... the mass of the metal. • The power of a metallic or other tissue to prevent explosion, will depend upon the heat required to produce the combustion as compared with that acquired by the tissue; and the flame of the most inflammable substances, and of those that produce most heat in combustion, will pass through a metallic tissue that will interrupt the flame of less inflammable substances, or those that produce little heat in combustion. Or the tissue being the same, and impermeable to all...
Pagina 81 - Thus induction appears to be essentially an action of contiguous particles, through the intermediation of which the electric force, originating or appearing at a certain place, is propagated to or sustained at a distance, appearing there as a force of the same kind exactly equal in amount, but opposite in its direction and tendencies (1164.).
Pagina 43 - The cause of the expansion of water at the moment of freezing is attributed to a new and peculiar arrangement of its particles. Ice is in reality crystallized water, and during its formation the particles arrange themselves in ranks and lines, which cross each other at angles of 60į and 120į, and consequently occupy more space than when liquid. This may be seen by examining the surface of water while freezing in a saucer.

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