Sports and Games of the Renaissance

Voorkant
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2004 - 199 pagina's

The Renaissance was a period of extraordinary spirit and development that marked a critical stage in the history of sports and games. In Europe the development of a moneyed economy and more refined methods of timekeeping ushered in a new era of leisure and leisure-activity, in which the old tradition of the Shrove Tuesday Football match deepened in the cultural consciousness. In Asia, Sumo's gradual codification began to develop alongside ancestors of the modern game of hackey-sack. In North and South America, European explorers saw how traditional team sports and games such as lacrosse and pelota could serve as an integrating and uniting phenomenon. Series editor Andrew Leibs provides narrative chapters on Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, North America, and Oceania, each of which shows how modern-day form of recreation evolved during the Renaissance. In addition, readers will learn how to play games that had been previously lost to history.

This volume is the latest installment in the Sports and Games Through History series. Each geographically arranged chapter describes sports, games, and rituals of play, along with descriptions on equipment and instructions for making or adapting game pieces.

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Inhoudsopgave

INTRODUCTION
xiii
AFRICA
1
ASIA
19
EUROPE
53
LATIN AMERICA
99
MIDDLE EAST
115
NORTH AMERICA
129
OCEANIA
169
BIBLIOGRAPHY
189
INDEX
191
Copyright

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Populaire passages

Pagina 158 - What seemed particularly odd to Rip was, that though these folks were evidently amusing themselves, yet they maintained the gravest faces, the most mysterious silence, and were, withal, the most melancholy party of pleasure he had ever witnessed.
Pagina 58 - Church; and as for our good people's lawful recreation, our pleasure likewise is, that after the end of divine service our good people be not disturbed, letted, or discouraged from any lawful recreation, such as dancing, either men or women; archery for men, leaping, vaulting, or any other such harmless recreation, nor from having of May-games, Whitsun-ales, and Morris-dances, and the setting up of Maypoles and other sports therewith used, so as the same be had in due and convenient time, without...
Pagina 10 - Okonkwo was well known throughout the nine villages and even beyond. His fame rested on solid personal achievements. As a young man of eighteen he had brought honor to his village by throwing Amalinze, the Cat. Amalinze was the great wrestler who for seven years was unbeaten from Umuofia to Mbaino. He was called the Cat because his back would never touch the earth. It was this man that Okonkwo threw in a fight which...
Pagina 95 - Slave, I have set my life upon a cast, And I will stand the hazard of the die: I think, there be six Richmonds in the field ; Five have I slain to-day, instead of him: — A horse ! a horse ! my kingdom for a horse ! [Exeunt.
Pagina 83 - OR, LAST IN HELL. WE two are last in hell ; what may we feare To be tormented or kept pris'ners here ? Alas ! if kissing be of plagues the worst, We'll wish, in hell we had been last and first.
Pagina 4 - Indeed every thing here, and all their treatment of me, made me forget that I was a slave. The language of these people resembled ours so nearly, that we understood each other perfectly. They had also the very same customs as we. There were likewise slaves daily to attend us, while my young master and I, with other boys, sported with our darts and bows and arrows, as I had been used to do at home.
Pagina 10 - As a young man of eighteen he had brought honour to his village by throwing Amalinze the Cat. Amalinze was the great wrestler who for seven years was unbeaten, from Umuofia to Mbaino. He was called the Cat because his back would never touch the earth. It was this man that Okonkwo threw in a fight which the old men agreed was one of the fiercest since the founder of their town engaged a spirit of the wild for seven days and seven nights.
Pagina 80 - The scholars of every school have their ball, or baton, in their hands; the ancient and wealthy men of the city come forth on horseback to see the sport of the young men, and to take part of the pleasure in beholding their agility. Every Friday in Lent a fresh company of young men comes into the field on horseback, and the best horseman conducteth the rest. Then march forth the citizens...
Pagina 4 - I was trained up from my earliest years in the art of war. My daily exercise was shooting and throwing javelins; and my mother adorned me with emblems, after the manner of our greatest warriors.
Pagina 178 - Sea, <£ surf breaking on the Shore. The Men sometimes 20 or 30 go without the Swell of the Surf...

Over de auteur (2004)

ANDREW LEIBS is a noted expert on sports and disability. He is the author of A Field Guide for the Sight-Impaired Reader and is editor of Greenwood's Sports & Games through History series. Sports & Games of the Renaissance is his second book. The National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association named Leibs New Hampshire Sportswriter of the Year in 1997 for his work at the Manchester Union Leader. He has written on sports and disability for numerous publications, including the Boston Globe and the San Francisco Examiner and has presented at national conferences. He lives in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Bibliografische gegevens