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chiualer Descoce, qenherdaunt estoit Bras of Bannockburn-Moray was a Robert de Bruys-was lying in in command of a body of horse. ambush for him with four hundred It could not be explained othermen, about half a league farther wise how he was able to intercept on. Gray's party contained only or overtake the cavalry of De six-and-twenty men-at-arms. To Clifford and De Beaumont in their these he explained the situation, attempt to reach Stirling Castle, and with one voice they declared after they had got round the left they would force the ambuscade. flank of the Scottish position. On The grooms and valets were di- the other hand, nobody could say rected to fall behind; a standard how Moray obtained cavalry for was given to them, with instruc- the purpose, as it is known that tions that they were on no account the only mounted troops in the to show themselves till their Scottish army were the 500 lances masters were engaged with the under Sir Robert de Keith. The enemy. The clump of spears difficulty is clearly explained in moved on, and, as they had been "Scalacronica.' warned, were fiercely attacked by According to Gray, it was the De Bickerton's men. Gray was original intention of Edward II., ready for them ; down went the in advancing from Stirling, to lances into rest, and the men-at- attack the Scots in their position arms charged clean through the on the Bannock Burn on Sunday, opposing force; wheeled, charged June 23. It is not quite clear back, and again a third time. De whether Gloucester, in pressing Bickerton's men had not bargained forward with the vanguard of for this : they had reckoned on heavy cavalry, was aware that the making an easy prey of such a main body had received orders to small party. Just then the party halt on the rising ground about of lads and grooms rode into view, Plean. At all events he held the standard gaily fluttering above

- les ioenes gentz them. The Scots beat a retreat, ne aresterent my tindrent lour and, getting into bad ground, left chemyns—and the famous singlenine score horses in a bog, which handed encounter took place beGray extricated at leisure, and tween King Robert and Sir Henry took home to his stables at de Bohun, or, as Gray avers, Piers Cupar.

de Montfort. Meanwhile De Perhaps the most interesting Clifford and De Beaumont had episode in the elder Gray's ad- been detached by Gloucester to ventures related by his son was make their way with 300 horse 1 his experience at Bannockburn. round the east flank of the Scots, It is historically important, too, past the hamlet of St Ninians, though it has received but little and effect communication with the serious attention, and affords an garrison of Stirling. King Robert insight into some of the circum- had foreseen this, and specially stances of that great battle which charged his nephew, Randolph have hitherto remained most ob- Moray, to prevent any such movescure. For instance, it has gene- ment. Now, Moray commanded rally been assumed by historians the central of the three divisions that, in the skirmish on the day of the Scottish line, and from his before the battle — the Quatre position commanded but an im

on

his way

1 Barbour says 800, but Gray is sure to be right in this instance.

that Wallace was arrested in the son, and brought Comyn safely to house of one Rawe Raa, in Glas- Dumfries, where their brother gow; and this Rawe or Ralf may Robert was waiting for them. have obtained his liberty on con- 'Sir,” they said to their future dition of betraying Wallace. The king, “he gave us such a handobloquy of this deed has usually some reception and such large been attached to Sir John de gifts, and won so upon us by his Menteith ; but that knight was open countenance, that we could Edward's Sheriff of Dunbarton, not bring ourselves to hurt him.” and would be doing no more than "Indeed," replied Robert ; "you his duty in receiving Wallace when are mighty particular.

Let me brought to him for imprisonment. meet him.” (Voir, bien estez lectous,

The next point in the 'Scala- lessez moi convenir.) cronica' which throws an original Then Bruce led Comyn before light on historical events is an the altar, and Gray gives a lengthy account of the circumstances of report of the interview, which, as the murder of John Comyn by it is impossible that the substance Robert de Brus. The statements could be known to any but the of historians are so various and two principals, who, it is supposed, irreconcilable on this subject that had drawn apart, is not worth it would be hardly worth while repeating afresh. He mentions, to add another, even under the however, that Sir Robert Comyn, hand of a contemporary, but for immediately on his nephew falling the curious fact that all Bruce's wounded, struck Bruce with his biographers have overlooked or sword, which glanced from his intentionally suppressed the story armour, and incontinently Sir told by Gray. It is distinctly un- Robert was cut down. The amplifavourable to Bruce, which tells tude of detail which Gray has put all the more seriously against him, into this incident is in marked because Gray generally writes in a contrast to the brevity of his remarkably impartial way, taking style in dealing with some of the as a man of the world, a broad most important transactions. view of characters and actions. There was plenty of work for

Writing in his prison in Edin- the elder Gray in the long warburgh in 1355, forty-nine years fare brought about by Bruce's reafter an event of which he must volt, and it may be gathered from have heard his father's account, the public records how constantly Gray states that on the fatal 10th he was employed on the Borders of February Robert de Brus sent during these years. But his son his two brothers, Thomas and has nothing to tell of his father's Neil, from Lochmaben to Dal- adventures till the spring of 1308. swinton, the residence of John The greatest of the Plantagenets Comyn, to invite him to an inter- had passed away before then, and view in the church of the Minorite men had cause already to realise Friars at Dumfries. They were how little of his powerful spirit instructed to ride with Comyn, had descended on Edward of Carattack and kill him on the way. narvon. Sir Thomas Gray was Comyn, however, received them so returning from the coronation of kindly and showed so much readi. Edward II. to the castle of Cupar, ness to ride with them and meet in Fife, of which he was governor, their brother, that Thomas and when a countryman warned him Neil thought shame of their trea- that Sir Walter de Bickerton

chiualer Descoce, qenherdaunt estoit Bras of Bannockburn-Moray was a Robert de Bruys-was lying in in command of a body of horse. ambush for him with four hundred It could not be explained othermen, about half a league farther wise how he was able to intercept on. Gray's party contained only or overtake the cavalry of De six-and-twenty men-at-arms. To Clifford and De Beaumont in their these he explained the situation, attempt to reach Stirling Castle, and with one voice they declared after they had got round the left they would force the ambuscade. flank of the Scottish position. On The grooms and valets were di- the other hand, nobody could say rected to fall behind; a standard how Moray obtained cavalry for was given to them, with instruc- the purpose, as it is known that tions that they were on no account the only mounted troops in the to show themselves till their Scottish army were the 500 lances masters were engaged with the under Sir Robert de Keith. The enemy. The clump of spears difficulty is clearly explained in moved on, and, as they had been "Scalacronica.' warned, were fiercely attacked by According to Gray, it was the De Bickerton's men. Gray was original intention of Edward II., ready for them ; down went the in advancing from Stirling, to lances into rest, and the men-at- attack the Scots in their position arms charged clean through the on the Bannock Burn on Sunday, opposing force; wheeled, charged June 23. It is not quite clear back, and again a third time. De whether Gloucester, in pressing Bickerton's men had not bargained forward with the vanguard of for this : they had reckoned on heavy cavalry, was aware that the making an easy prey of such a main body had received orders to small party. Just then the party halt on the rising ground about of lads and grooms rode into view, Plean. At all events he held the standard gaily fluttering above his way les ioenes gentz them. The Scots beat a retreat, ne aresterent my tindrent lour and, getting into bad ground, left chemyns--and the famous singlenine score horses in a bog, which handed encounter took place beGray extricated at leisure, and tween King Robert and Sir Henry took home to his stables at de Bohun, or, as Gray avers, Piers Cupar.

de Montfort. Meanwhile De Perhaps the most interesting Clifford and De Beaumont had episode in the elder Gray's ad- been detached by Gloucester to ventures related by his son was make their way with 300 horse his experience at Bannockburn. round the east flank of the Scots, It is historically important, too, past the hamlet of St Ninians, though it has received but little and effect communication with the serious attention, and affords an garrison of Stirling. King Robert insight into some of the circum- had foreseen this, and specially stances of that great battle which charged his nephew, Randolph have hitherto remained most ob- Moray, to prevent any such movescure. For instance, it has gene- ment. Now, Moray commanded rally been assumed by historians the central of the three divisions that, in the skirmish on the day of the Scottish line, and from his before the battle — the Quatre position commanded but an im

on

1

1 Barbour says 800, but Gray is sure to be right in this instance.

that Wallace was arrested in the son, and brought Comyn safely to house of one Rawe Raa, in Glas- Dumfries, where their brother gow; and this Rawe or Ralf may Robert was waiting for them. have obtained his liberty on con- 'Sir," they said to their future dition of betraying Wallace. The king," he gave us such a handobloquy of this deed has usually some reception and such large been attached to Sir John de gifts, and won so upon us by his Menteith; but that knight was

open countenance, that we could Edward's Sheriff of Dunbarton, not bring ourselves to hurt him.” and would be doing no more than "Indeed," replied Robert ; "you his duty in receiving Wallace when are mighty particular.

Let me brought to him for imprisonment. meet him.” (Voir, bien estez lectous,

The next point in the 'Scala- lessez moi convenir.) cronica' which throws an original Then Bruce led Comyn before light on historical events is an the altar, and Gray gives a lengthy account of the circumstances of report of the interview, which, as the murder of John Comyn by it is impossible that the substance Robert de Brus. The statements could be known to any but the of historians are so various and two principals, who, it is supposed, irreconcilable on this subject that had drawn apart, is not worth it would be hardly worth while repeating afresh. He mentions, to add another, even under the however, that Sir Robert Comyn, hand of a contemporary, but for immediately on his nephew falling the curious fact that all Bruce's wounded, struck Bruce with his biographers have overlooked or sword, which glanced from his intentionally suppressed the story armour, and incontinently Sir told by Gray. It is distinctly un- Robert was cut down. The amplifavourable to Bruce, which tells tude of detail which Gray has put all the more seriously against him, into this incident is in marked because Gray generally writes in a contrast to the brevity of his remarkably impartial way, taking, style in dealing with some of the as a man of the world, a broad most important transactions. view of characters and actions. There was plenty of work for

Writing in his prison in Edin- the elder Gray in the long warburgh in 1355, forty-nine years fare brought about by Bruce's reafter an event of which he must volt, and it may be gathered from have heard his father's account, the public records how constantly Gray states that on the fatal 10th he was employed on the Borders of February Robert de Brus sent during these years. But his son his two brothers, Thomas and has nothing to tell of his father's Neil, from Lochmaben to Dal- adventures till the spring of 1308. swinton, the residence of John The greatest of the Plantagenets Comyn, to invite him to an inter- had passed away before then, and view in the church of the Minorite men had cause already to realise Friars at Dumfries. They were how little of his powerful spirit instructed to ride with Comyn, had descended on Edward of Carattack and kill him on the way. narvon. Sir Thomas Gray was Comyn, however, received them so returning from the coronation of kindly and showed so much readi- Edward II. to the castle of Cupar, ness to ride with them and meet in Fife, of which he was governor, their brother, that Thomas and when a countryman warned him Neil thought shame of their trea- that Sir Walter de Bickerton

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chiualer Descoce, qenherdaunt estoit Bras of Bannockburn-Moray was a Robert de Bruys-was lying in in command of a body of horse. ambush for him with four hundred It could not be explained othermen, about half a league farther wise how he was able to intercept on. Gray's party contained only or overtake the cavalry of De six-and-twenty men-at-arms. To Clifford and De Beaumont in their these he explained the situation, attempt to reach Stirling Castle, and with one voice they declared after they had got round the left they would force the ambuscade. flank of the Scottish position. On The grooms and valets were di- the other hand, nobody could say rected to fall behind; a standard how Moray obtained cavalry for was given to them, with instruc- the purpose, as it is known that tions that they were on no account the only mounted troops in the to show themselves till their Scottish army were the 500 lances masters were engaged with the under Sir Robert de Keith. The enemy. The clump of spears difficulty is clearly explained in moved on, and, as they had been "Scalacronica.' warned, were fiercely attacked by According to Gray, it was the De Bickerton's men. Gray was original intention of Edward II., ready for them; down went the in advancing from Stirling, to lances into rest, and the men-at- attack the Scots in their position arms charged clean through the on the Bannock Burn on Sunday, opposing force; wheeled, charged June 23. It is not quite clear back, and again a third time. De whether Gloucester, in pressing Bickerton's men had not bargained forward with the vanguard of for this : they had reckoned on heavy cavalry, was aware that the making an easy prey of such a main body had received orders to small party. Just then the party halt on the rising ground about of lads and grooms rode into view, Plean. At all events he held the standard gaily fluttering above

les ioenes gentz them. The Scots beat a retreat, ne aresterent my tindrent lour and, getting into bad ground, left chemyns-and the famous singlenine score horses in a bog, which handed encounter took place beGray extricated at leisure, and tween King Robert and Sir Henry took home to his stables at de Bohun, or, as Gray avers, Piers Cupar.

de Montfort. Meanwhile De Perhaps the most interesting Clifford and De Beaumont had episode in the elder Gray's ad- been detached by Gloucester to ventures related by his son was make their way with 300 horse 1 his experience at Bannockburn. round the east flank of the Scots, It is historically important, too, past the hamlet of St Ninians, though it has received but little and effect communication with the serious attention, and affords an garrison of Stirling. King Robert insight into some of the circum- had foreseen this, and specially stances of that great battle which charged his nephew, Randolph have hitherto remained most ob- Moray, to prevent any such movescure. For instance, it has gene- ment. Now, Moray commanded rally been assumed by historians the central of the three divisions that, in the skirmish on the day of the Scottish line, and from his before the battle — the Quatre position commanded but an im

on

his way

1 Barbour says 800, but Gray is sure to be right in this instance.

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