The Antiquary

Voorkant
Classic Books Company, 2001 - 358 pagina's
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The Antiquary, Scott's personal favorite among his novels, is characteristically wry and urbane. A mysterious young man calling himself 'Lovel' travels idly but fatefully toward the Scottish seaside town of Fairport. Here he is befriended by the antiquary Jonathan Oldbuck, who has taken refuge from his own personal disappointments in the obsessive study of miscellaneous history. Their slow unraveling of Lovel's true identity will unearth and redeem the secrets and lies which have devastated the guilt-haunted Earl of Glenallan, and will reinstate the tottering fortunes of Sir Arthur Wardour and his daughter Isabella.First published in 1816 in the aftermath of Waterloo, The Antiquary deals with the problem of how to understand the past so as to enable the future. Set in the tense times of the wars with revolutionary France, it displays Scott's matchless skill at painting the social panorama and in creating vivid characters, from the earthy beggar Edie Ochiltree to the loquacious and shrewdly humorous Antiquary himself.The text is based on Scott's own final, authorized version, the "Magnum Opus" edition of 1829.

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Geselecteerde pagina's

Inhoudsopgave

I
3
II
20
III
34
IV
48
V
64
VI
78
VII
93
VIII
101
XV
199
XVI
213
XVII
225
XVIII
237
XIX
249
XX
263
XXI
280
XXII
294

IX
111
X
129
XI
141
XII
152
XIII
167
XIV
182
XXIII
308
XXIV
320
XXV
337
XXVI
339
XXVII
344

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Veelvoorkomende woorden en zinsdelen

Populaire passages

Pagina 199 - Crabbed age and youth cannot live together Youth is full of pleasance, age is full of care; Youth like summer morn, age like winter weather; Youth like summer brave, age like winter bare; Youth is full of sport, age's breath is short; Youth is nimble, age is lame; Youth is hot and bold, age is weak and cold; Youth is wild, and age is tame.
Pagina 167 - ... us maun to our wark again, if our hearts were beating as hard as my hammer.
Pagina 249 - The herring loves the merry moon-light, The mackerel loves the wind, But the oyster loves the dredging sang, For they come of a gentle kind.
Pagina 33 - Your marchesite, your tutie, your magnesia, Your toad, your crow, your dragon, and your panther ; Your sun, your moon, your firmament, your adrop, Your lato, azoch, zernich, chibrit, heautarit, And then your red man, and your white woman, With all your broths, your menstrues, and materials Of piss and egg-shells, women's terms, man's blood, Hair o...
Pagina 93 - He had scarce uttered the words, when it was rung again, with greater violence than before ; and the ecclesiastic, perceiving further expostulation impossible, lifted his finger at Macraw with a menacing attitude, as he left the apartment. " I tell'd ye sae, " said the Aberdeen man, in a whisper to Edie ; and then proceeded to open the door near which they had observed the chaplain stationed. CHAPTER XXVIII.
Pagina 3 - Raymond, as in his closet pent, Laughs at such danger and adventurement, When half his lands are spent in golden smoke, And now his second hopeful glasse is broke, But yet, if haply his third, furnace hold, Devoteth all his pots and, pans to gold.
Pagina 133 - ... grief seemed to succeed each other more than once upon her torpid features. But she spoke not a word, neither had she shed a tear; nor did one of the family understand, either from look or expression, to what extent she comprehended the uncommon bustle around her.
Pagina 250 - I'll begin a bonnier ane than that — Now baud your tongue, baith wife and carle, And listen, great and sma', And I will sing of Glenallan's Earl That fought on the Red Harlaw. The cronach's cried on Bennachie, And doun the Don and a', And hieland and lawland may mournfu' be, For the sair field of Harlaw.
Pagina 48 - And, ere our coming, see thou shake the bags Of hoarding abbots ; angels imprisoned Set thou at liberty : the fat ribs of peace Must by the hungry now be fed upon : Use our commission in his utmost force.

Over de auteur (2001)

Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh, Scotland on August 15, 1771. He began his literary career by writing metrical tales. The Lay of the Last Minstrel, Marmion, and The Lady of the Lake made him the most popular poet of his day. Sixty-five hundred copies of The Lay of the Last Minstrel were sold in the first three years, a record sale for poetry. His other poems include The Vision of Don Roderick, Rokeby, and The Lord of the Isles. He then abandoned poetry for prose. In 1814, he anonymously published a historical novel, Waverly, or, Sixty Years Since, the first of the series known as the Waverley novels. He wrote 23 novels anonymously during the next 13 years. The first master of historical fiction, he wrote novels that are historical in background rather than in character: A fictitious person always holds the foreground. In their historical sequence, the Waverley novels range in setting from the year 1090, the time of the First Crusade, to 1700, the period covered in St. Roman's Well (1824), set in a Scottish watering place. His other works include Ivanhoe, Rob Roy, and The Bride of Lammermoor. He died on September 21, 1832.

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