The Quest of the Chief Good: Expository Lectures on the Book Ecclesiastes : with a New Translation

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Arthur Miall, 1867 - 320 pagina's
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Pagina 305 - In the corrupted currents of this world Offence's gilded hand may shove by justice, And oft 'tis seen the wicked prize itself Buys out the law...
Pagina 10 - And Judah and Israel dwelt safely, every man under his vine and under his figtree, from Dan even to Beer-sheba, all the days of Solomon.
Pagina 246 - Let the field be joyful, and all that is therein : then shall all the trees of the wood rejoice before • the Lord : For he cometh, for he cometh to judge the earth : he shall judge the world with righteousness, and the people with his truth.
Pagina 60 - Persia, that he made a proclamation throughout all his kingdom, and put it also in writing, saying, thus saith Cyrus, king of Persia, the Lord God of heaven hath given me all the kingdoms of the earth ; and he hath charged me to build him an house at Jerusalem, which is in Judah.
Pagina 120 - I CHATTER over stony ways, In little sharps and trebles, I bubble into eddying bays, I babble on the pebbles. With many a curve my banks I fret By many a field and fallow, And many a fairy foreland set With willow-weed and mallow.
Pagina 54 - And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted, And right perfection wrongfully disgraced, And strength by limping sway disabled, And art made tongue-tied by authority, And folly doctor-like controlling skill, And simple truth miscall'd simplicity, And captive good attending captain ill.
Pagina 81 - Be not rash with thy mouth, and let not thine heart be hasty to utter any thing before God: for God is in heaven, and thou upon earth : therefore let thy words be few.
Pagina 129 - For who would bear the whips and scorns of time, The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely, The pangs of despised love, the law's delay, The insolence of office, and the spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes, When he himself might his quietus make With a bare bodkin?
Pagina 120 - I steal by lawns and grassy plots, ' I slide by hazel covers; I move the sweet forget-me-nots That grow for happy lovers.
Pagina 312 - Who God doth late and early pray More of his grace than gifts to lend; And entertains the harmless day With a religious book or friend — This man is freed from servile bands Of hope to rise or fear to fall: Lord of himself, though not of lands, And, having nothing, yet hath all.

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