The Carlyle Encyclopedia

Voorkant
Mark Cumming
Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, 2004 - 521 pagina's
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The Carlyle Encyclopedia is the new standard, single-volume reference work on the lives and writings of Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle. Written by over fifty contributors from the United States, Scotland, England, Canada, and Germany, it offers detailed accounts of central topics in Carlyle studies and provides bibliographic citations which direct the reader's attention to a wide range of additional sources.
The Carlyle Encyclopedia focuses primarily on Thomas Carlyle. It reflects the range of his interests and resists stereotyped impression of who he was and what he believed. It covers Carlyle's entire life, without privileging any particular work or period, and locates Carlyle in his time and place, in the context of a rich and challenging age. The Carlyle Encyclopedia also gives a balanced assessment of Jane Welsh Carlyle, which avoids either belittling her or overestimating her achievement. It avoids the reductive and contradictory stereotypes of her which were offered by early biographers of Thomas Carlyle and offers instead a study of her varied friendships and her trenchant observations on contemporary life.
The Carlyle Encyclopedia will interest a variety of readers who concern themselves with literature, social history, the history of ideas, Victorian culture, and Scottish studies.

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Pagina 199 - Nor thro' the questions men may try, The petty cobwebs we have spun: If e'er when faith had fall'n asleep, I heard a voice "believe no more" And heard an ever-breaking shore That tumbled in the Godless deep; A warmth within the breast would melt The freezing reason's colder part, And like a man in wrath the heart Stood up and answer'd "I have felt.
Pagina 230 - JENNY kissed me when we met, Jumping from the chair she sat in; Time, you thief, who love to get Sweets into your list, put that in! Say I'm weary, say I'm sad, Say that health and wealth have missed me, Say I'm growing old, but add, Jenny kissed me.
Pagina 84 - The bourgeoisie, wherever it has got the upper hand, has put an end to all feudal, patriarchal, idyllic relations. It has pitilessly torn asunder the motley feudal ties that bound man to his "natural superiors," and has left remaining no other nexus between man and man than naked self-interest, than callous "cash payment.
Pagina 84 - We call it a Society; and go about professing openly the totalest separation, isolation. Our life is not a mutual helpfulness; but rather, cloaked under due laws-of-war, named ' fair competition' and so forth, it is a mutual hostility. We have profoundly forgotten everywhere that Cash-payment is not the sole relation of human beings ; we think, nothing doubting, that it absolves and liquidates all engagements of man. " My starving workers ?" answers the rich millowner: "Did not I hire them fairly...
Pagina 30 - Where wast thou when I laid the foundations of the earth ? Declare, if thou hast understanding.
Pagina 113 - Allegory,' perhaps an idle Allegory! It is a sublime embodiment, or sublimest, of the soul of Christianity. It expresses, as in huge, world-wide, architectural emblems, how the Christian Dante felt Good and Evil to be the two polar elements of this Creation, on which it all turns; that these two differ not by...
Pagina 153 - Thus had the EVERLASTING No (das ewige Nein) pealed ' authoritatively through all the recesses of my Being, of my ' ME ; and then was it that my whole ME stood up, in ' native God-created majesty, and with emphasis recorded
Pagina 503 - Labour is Life : from the inmost heart of the Worker rises his godgiven Force, the sacred celestial Life-essence breathed into him by Almighty God; from his inmost heart awakens him to all nobleness, — to all knowledge, 'self-knowledge' and much else, so soon as Work fitly begins.
Pagina 108 - There is no end to machinery. Even the horse is stripped of his harness, and finds a fleet fire-horse yoked in his stead. Nay, we have an artist that hatches chickens by steam ; the very brood-hen is to be superseded ! For all earthly, and for some unearthly purposes, we have machines and mechanic furtherances; for mincing our cabbages ; for casting us into magnetic sleep.

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