The presidency. The Coup d'Etat. Establishment of the empire

Voorkant
Longmans, Green, 1877
 

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Pagina 290 - As to respect for the law and Constitution, which you say in your despatch of yesterday is habitual to Englishmen, that respect belongs to just and equitable laws framed under a Constitution founded upon reason, and consecrated by its antiquity and by the memory of the long years of happiness which the nation has enjoyed under it, but it is scarcely a proper application of those feelings to require them to be directed to the day-before-yesterday tomfoolery which the scatter-brained heads of Marrast...
Pagina 436 - Les ministres ne dépendent que du chef de l'État; ils ne sont responsables que chacun en ce qui le concerne des actes du Gouvernement ; il n'ya point de solidarité entre eux ; ils ne peuvent être mis en accusation que par le sénat.
Pagina 303 - ... incendiary Journal on the 14th, and in the Times on the 16th. He there exults in the coup d'etat as having been also a coup de grace to all Socialists, Revolutionists, and Bandits throughout France and Europe — a sufficient reason, he fairly adds, for all honest men to rejoice. On the one side he lauds the Dictatorship ' of a Prince who has rendered for three years incomparable services to the cause of order and Catholicism.
Pagina 402 - Very soon, in betaking myself to Notre Dame, I shall present the Empress to the people and the army ; the confidence they have in me...
Pagina 402 - It remained for me to choose my wife. She who has become the object of my choice is of lofty birth. French in heart, by education, by the memory of the blood shed by her father in the cause of the Empire, she has as a Spaniard, the advantage of not having a family in France, to whom it would be necessary to give honours and dignities. Gifted with every quality of the heart, she will be the ornament of the throne, as in the hour of danger she would be one of its most courageous defenders. A pious...
Pagina 402 - ... French facility in her manners, and a genuine English thoroughness in her knowledge and accomplishments. She knows the five chief modern languages well, and feels their different characters, and estimates their literatures aright ; she has the foreign accomplishments of singing, playing, painting, etc., and the national one of dancing, in a high degree. In conversation she is brilliant and original ; and yet, with all this, she is a true Spaniard, and as full of Spanish feelings as she is of...
Pagina 290 - British ambassador, to pronounce judgment upon that event ; but if your Excellency wishes to know my own opinion on the change which has taken place in France, it is that such a state of antagonism had arisen between the President and the Assembly that it was becoming every day more clear that their co-existence could not be of long duration ; and it seemed to me better for the interests of France, and, through them, for the interests of the rest of Europe, that the power of the President should...
Pagina 81 - ... by replacing on the pontifical throne the Prince who was the first to place himself boldly at the head of all useful reforms. I learn with pain that the benevolent intentions of the Holy Father, like our own action, remain sterile in presence of hostile passions and influences.
Pagina 402 - ... educated strictly and faithfully by her mother, a Scotchwoman, — who, for this purpose, carried her to London and Paris, and kept her there between six and seven years, — possessing extraordinary talents, and giving an air of originality to all she says and does, she unites, in a most bewitching manner, the Andalusian grace and frankness to a French facility in her manners, and a genuine English thoroughness in her knowledge and accomplishments. She knows the five chief modern languages well,...
Pagina 222 - Joiuville and the Due d'Aumale were gone to Lille to take the command of troops to act against the President ; that the Royal Family had endeavoured to dissuade the Prince de Joinville from this step, but in vain ; and that, finding him determined on doing so, the Due d'Aumale had said : " My brother is a sailor ; he knows nothing of military operations. I am a soldier ; I will go with him and share his fate and fortune.