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DRAMATIC.


The Good-natured Man. A Comedy,
She Stoops to Conquer, or, the Mistakes of a
Night. A Comedy,

An Oratorio; first printed in the Paris edi-

tion, in 1825, from the original in Dr.

Goldsmith's own handwriting,

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PREFACES AND CRITICISM.

The Preface to Dr. Brookes's Natural His-

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XX. Some account of the republic of

letters in England,

269

272

XXI. The Chinese goes to see a play, 270
XXII. The Chinese philosopher's son
made a slave in Persia,
XXIII. The English subscription in fa-
vour of the French prisoners
commended, .

XXIV. The venders of quack medicines
and nostrums ridiculed,

XXV. The natural rise and decline of
kingdoms, exemplified in the

history of the kingdom of Lao, 275
XXVI. The character of the man in
black, with some instances of
his inconsistent conduct,

276
XXVII. The history of the man in black, 278
XXVIII. On the great numbers of old
maids and bachelors in Lon-
don. Some of the causes,
XXIX. A description of a club of au-
thors,
XXX. The proceedings of the club of

282

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authors,

XXXI. The perfection of the Chinese
in the art of gardening. The
description of a Chinese garden 384|

XXXII. Of the degeneracy of some of the

English nobility. A mush-

room feast among the Tartars, 285

XXXIII. The manner of writing among
the Chinese. The eastern tales
of magazines, etc. ridiculed,
XXXIV. Of the present ridiculous passion
of the nobility for painting,
XXXV. The philosopher's son describes
a lady, his fellow-captive,
XXXVI. A continuance of his correspond-
ence. The beautiful captive
consents to marry her lord, . 291

XXXVII. The correspondence still con-

tinued. He begins to be dis-

gusted in the pursuit of wis-

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LII. The impossibility of distinguish-
ing men in England by their
dress. Two instances of this, 312
LIII. The absurd taste for obscene and
pert novels, such as Tristram
Shandy, ridiculed,
LIV. The character of an important
trifler, .

LV. His character continued; with

that of his wife, his house, and

furniture,

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CVIII. The utility and entertainment
which might result from a jour-
ney into the East,

CIX. The Chinese philosopher attempts

to find out famous men,

CX. Some projects for introducing Asi-

atic employments into the courts

of England,

CXI. On the different sects in England,
particularly Methodism,

CXII. An election described,

CXIII. A literary contest of great import-

ance; in which both sides fight by

epigram,

383

CXIV. Against the marriage act. A fable, 385
CXV. On the danger of having too high
an opinion of human nature, 386
CXVI. Whether love be a natural or ficti-
tious passion,

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CXVII. A city night-piece,

CXVIII. On the meanness of the Dutch at

the court of Japan,

CXIX. On the distresses of the poor exem-
plified in the life of a private sen-
tinel,
CXX. On the absurdity of some late En-
glish titles,

CXXI. The irresolution of the English ac-
counted for,

CXXII. The manner of travellers in their
usual relations ridiculed,

CXXIII. The conclusion,

III. On the Use of Language,

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A Flemish Tradition,

The Sagacity of some Insects,

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The History of Hyspasia,

On Justice and Generosity,
Some particulars relative to Father

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X. Female Warriors,

XI. National Prejudices,

XII. Taste,

XIII. Cultivation of Taste,

XIV. Origin of Poetry,

XV. Poetry distinguished from other
Writing,
XVI. Metaphors,

XVII. Hyperboles,

435
436 XVIII. Versification,

438

439

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MEMOIRS

OF THE

LIFE AND WRITINGS

OF

Oliver Goldsmith.

There are few writers for whom the reader feels | villages claim the honour of having given him such personal kindness as for Oliver Goldsmith. birth: Pallas in the county of Longford; and ElThe fascinating ease and simplicity of his style; phin, in the county of Roscommon. The former the benevolence that beams through every page; is named as the place in the epitaph by Dr. Johnthe whimsical yet amiable views of human life and son, inscribed on his monument in Westminster human nature; the mellow unforced humour, Abbey; but later investigations have decided in fablended so happily with good feeling and good vour of Elphin. sense, throughout his writings; win their way irresistibly to the affections and carry the author with them. While writers of greater pretensions and more sounding names are suffered to lie upon our shelves, the works of Goldsmith are cherished and laid in our bosoms. We do not quote them with ostentation, but they mingle with our minds; they sweeten our tempers and harmonize our thoughts; they put us in good humour with ourselves and with the world, and in so doing they make us hap-on her relations for support.

He was the second son of the Rev. Charles Goldsmith, a clergyman of the established church, but without any patrimony. His mother was daughter of the Rev. Oliver Jones, master of the diocesan school at Elphin. It was not till some time after the birth of Oliver that his father obtained the living of Kilkenny-West, in the county of Westmeath. Previous to this period he and his wife appear to have been almost entirely dependent

pier and better men.

His father was equally distinguished for his lite

We have been curious therefore in gathering to-rary attainments and for the benevolence of his gether all the heterogeneous particulars concerning heart. His family consisted of five sons and two poor Goldsmith that still exist; and seldom have we daughters. From this little world of home Goldmet with an author's life more illustrative of his smith has drawn many of his domestic scenes, works, or works more faithfully illustrative of the both whimsical and touching, which appeal so forauthor's life. His rambling biography displays cibly to the heart, as well as to the fancy; his fahim the same kind, artless, good humoured, excur- ther's fireside furnished many of the family scenes sive, sensible, whimsical, intelligent being that he of the Vicar of Wakefield; and it is said that the appears in his writings. Scarcely an adventure or learned simplicity and amiable peculiarities of that a character is given in his page that may not be worthy divine have been happily illustrated in the traced to his own parti-coloured story. Many of character of Dr. Primrose. his most ludicrous scenes and ridiculous incidents have been drawn from his own blunders and mischances, and he seems really to have been buffeted into almost every maxim imparted by him for the instruction of his readers.

Oliver Goldsmith was a native of Ireland, and was born on the 29th of November, 1728. Two

"The present biography is principally taken from the Scotch edition of Goldsmith's works, published in 1821.

The Rev. Henry Goldsmith, elder brother of the poet, and born seven years before him, was a man of estimable worth and excellent talents. Great expectations were formed of him, from the promise of his youth, both when at school and at college; but he offended and disappointed his friends, by entering into matrimony at the early age of nineteen, and resigning all ambitious views for love and a curacy. If, however, we may be lieve the pictures drawn by the poet of his brother's

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