The Rainbow

Voorkant
Wordsworth Editions, 1995 - 418 pagina's

With an Introduction and Notes by Lionel Kelly, University of Reading.

In 1915, Lawrence's frank representation of sexuality in The Rainbow caused a furore and the novel was seized by the police and banned almost as soon as it was published. Today it is recognised as one of the classic English novels of the twentieth century.

The Rainbow is about three generations of the Brangwen family of Nottinghamshire from the 1840s to the early years of the twentieth century. Within this framework Lawrence's essential concern is with the passional lives of his characters as he explores the pressures that determine their lives, using a religious symbolism in which the 'rainbow' of the title is his unifying motif.

His primary focus is on the individual's struggle to growth and fulfilment within marriage and changing social circumstances, a process shown to grow more difficult through the generations. Young Ursula Brangwen, whose story is continued in Women in Love, is finally the central figure in Lawrence's anatomy of the confining structures of English social life and the impact of industrialisation and urbanisation on the human psyche.

 

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Review: The Rainbow (Wordsworth Classics) (Brangwen Family #1)

Gebruikersrecensie  - Natalie - Goodreads

Ok. There are more-delicious reads out there. There are some vaguely interesting and progressive ideas about women's independence. However, even I, literature lover (and major, even in grad school ... Volledige review lezen

Inhoudsopgave

ONE How Tom Brangwen Married a Polish Lady
3
Two They Live at the Marsh
39
THREE Childhood of Anna Lensky
66
FOUR Girlhood of Anna Brangwen
80
SEVEN The Cathedral
164
EIGHT The Child
176
ELEVEN First Love
237
TWELVE Shame
280
THIRTEEN The Mans World
297
FOURTEEN The Widening Circle
348
NOTES
419
Copyright

Veelvoorkomende woorden en zinsdelen

Over de auteur (1995)

D(avid) H(erbert) Lawrence was born on September 11, 1885. His father was a coal miner and Lawrence grew up in a mining town in England. He always hated the mines, however, and frequently used them in his writing to represent both darkness and industrialism, which he despised because he felt it was scarring the English countryside. Lawrence attended high school and college in Nottingham and, after graduation, became a school teacher in Croyden in 1908. Although his first two novels had been unsuccessful, he turned to writing full time when a serious illness forced him to stop teaching. Lawrence spent much of his adult life abroad in Europe, particularly Italy, where he wrote some of his most significant and most controversial novels, including Sons and Lovers and Lady Chatterly's Lover. Lawrence and his wife, Frieda, who had left her first husband and her children to live with him, spent several years touring Europe and also lived in New Mexico for a time. Lawrence had been a frail child, and he suffered much of his life from tuberculosis. Eventually, he retired to a sanitorium in Nice, France. He died in France in 1930, at age 44. In his relatively short life, he produced more than 50 volumes of short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel journals, and letters, in addition to the novels for which he is best known.

Bibliografische gegevens