In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process. The Colonial Period

Voorkant
OUP USA, 7 aug. 1980 - 512 pagina's
I knew there was an indisputable nexus between the dark shadow of repression under which, historically, most American blacks have lived and the rioting occurring within ten blocks of the White House. Why, I thought to myself, in the land of the free and the home of the brave, had even brave blacks so often failed to get free? Why had that very legal process that had been devised to protect the rights of individuals against the will of the government and the whim of the majority been often employed so malevolently against blacks?
 

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Inhoudsopgave

Introduction
3
The Leader
19
Slaves and the Pilgrims
61
From HalfFreedom to Slavery
100
Blacks in New York A fter the War 13 8
143
White MinorityBlack Majority
151
Legislative Enforcement of Racial Slavery
167
From Antislavery to Slavery
216
Influence
267
The Setting
313
The Case of James Sommersett A Negro
333
The Legacy of Sommersett
356
THE REVOLUTION
371
The Moral Antecedents for Challenging in 1776
377
IN THE MATTER OF COLOR
390
Bibliography
397

A ntislavery Law
222
The Failure of the Indentured Servant System
236
The 1750 Slavery Law
248
An Evaluation
266
Notes
405
Index
481
Table of Cases
511
Copyright

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Over de auteur (1980)

A. Leon Higginbotham is at Justice with the United States Court of Appeals, Third Circuit.

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