Fakesong: The Manufacture of British "folksong" 1700 to the Present Day

Voorkant
Open University Press, 1985 - 297 pagina's
0 Recensies
Reviews worden niet geverifieerd, maar Google checkt wel op nepcontent en verwijdert zulke content als die wordt gevonden.
"'Folksongs' interest many people nowadays, because they are meant to be the kinds of songs most of our ancestors sang, before industrialisation, before the mass media, before music and song became commodities, and before all the assorted evils associated with advanced capitalist society. 'Folksongs' and 'ballads' represent real values something honest and straightforward and beautiful to hang on to, and make us feel our roots in the Britain of 1900 or 1800 or even 1700. The only problem with this way of thinking is that it is based on myths. What we now know as 'folksongs' and 'ballads' were sought after, collected, edited and published by individuals who were either members of the rising bourgeoisie, or were ideologically sympathetic to bourgeois culture and values. The working people who sang their songs, and had them chopped up, amended and sometimes re-written or invented on their behalf, are remarkably absent from the story of 'folksong'. Before we can begin to piece together the real history of our ancestors' culture, we have to penetrate the 'mediations' of people like Cecil Sharp, Francis James Child and Albert Lancaster Lloyd, and to begin building again on firmer foundations. This book sets out to clear the ground"--Page 4 of cover.

Vanuit het boek

Wat mensen zeggen - Een review schrijven

We hebben geen reviews gevonden op de gebruikelijke plaatsen.

Inhoudsopgave

TWO CENTURIES BIEFORE CHILD
1
FRANCIS JAMES CHILD AND THE BALLAD
99
CECIL JAMES SHARP AND THE FOLKSONG
139
Copyright

3 andere gedeelten niet getoond

Overige edities - Alles bekijken

Veelvoorkomende woorden en zinsdelen

Bibliografische gegevens