The Suppression of the African Slave Trade to the United States of America 1638-1870

Voorkant
Cosimo, Inc., 1 okt. 2007 - 352 pagina's
Based on the Harvard thesis of DuBois-one of the great black intellectuals of American history-and incorporating analyses of national, state, and colonial statues, Congressional documents, personal narratives, and other foundational sources, this essential work of African-American history examines the prosecution of slavery laws in the early colonies in North America and explores the moral, political, and economical ramifications of the slave trade and its opposition. Topics covered include: . the Revolutionary period . the Federal Convention of 1787 . Toussaint L'Ouverture and the antislavery efforts of 1787 to 1807 . the international slave trade . the rise of the cotton kingdom from 1820 to 1850 . the Civil War era . and more This study of the slave-trade laws remains a vital resource for students of early America. American writer, civil rights activist, and scholar WILLIAM EEDWARD BURGHARDT DUBOIS (1868-1963) was the first black man to receive a PhD from Harvard University. A cofounder of the NAACP, he wrote a number of important books, including The Philadelphia Negro (1899), Black Folk, Then and Now (1899), and The Negro (1915).
 

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Gebruikersrecensie  - DavidAPino - LibraryThing

Arguably one of the best books ever written on the subject of Reconstruction. W.E.B. Du Bois offers an effective retort against the racist historiography of the Dunning School by offering his own ... Volledige review lezen

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Veelvoorkomende woorden en zinsdelen

Populaire passages

Pagina 315 - Convention, / September 17, 1787. / Reprinted from the Original Text. / with an / Historical Introduction and Notes, / By Henry B. Dawson.
Pagina 21 - This is to the monthly meeting held at Richard Worrell's: These are the reasons why we are against the traffic of men-body, as followeth: Is there any that would be done or handled at this manner?

Over de auteur (2007)

Civil rights leader and author, William Edward Burghardt Du Bois was born in Great Barrington, Massachusetts on February 23, 1868. He earned a B.A. from both Harvard and Fisk universities, an M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard, and studied at the University of Berlin. He taught briefly at Wilberforce University before he came professor of history and economics at Atlanta University in Ohio (1896-1910). There, he wrote The Souls of Black Folk (1903), in which he pointed out that it was up to whites and blacks jointly to solve the problems created by the denial of civil rights to blacks. In 1905, Du Bois became a major figure in the Niagara Movement, a crusading effort to end discrimination. The organization collapsed, but it prepared the way for the founding of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), in which Du Bois played a major role. In 1910, he became editor of the NAACP magazine, a position he held for more than 20 years. Du Bois returned to Atlanta University in 1932 and tried to implement a plan to make the Negro Land Grant Colleges centers of black power. Atlanta approved of his idea, but later retracted its support. When Du Bois tried to return to NAACP, it rejected him too. Active in several Pan-African Congresses, Du Bois came to know Fwame Nkrumah, the first president of Ghana, and Jono Kenyatta the president of Kenya. In 1961, the same year Du Bois joined the Communist party, Nkrumah invited him to Ghana as a director of an Encyclopedia Africana project. He died there on August 27, 1963, after becoming a citizen of that country.

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