A History of Greece, Volume 11

Voorkant
J. Murray, 1853
 

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Inhoudsopgave

Dionysius gains the prize of tragedy at the Lenæun festival
69
CHAPTER LXXXIV
75
Plato Dion and the Pythagorean philosophers
81
Dion maintains the good opinion and confidence of Dionysius
84
His earnest exhortations produce considerable effect inspiring
93
Injudicious manner in which Plato dealt with Dionysius
101
Relations between Dionysius and Dionnatural foundation
107
Resolution of Dion to avenge himself on Dionysius and to force
114
Means of auxiliaries of DionPlatothe AcademyAlkimenes
116
Eclipse of the moonreligious disquietude of the soldiersthey
122
Entry of Dion into Achradinajoy of the citizenshe proclaims
129
Sudden sally made by Dionysius to surprise the blockading wall
135
Intrigues of Dionysius against Dion in Syracuse
139
Dion is forced to retreat from Syracusebad conduct of the
147
Entrance of Dion into Syracusehe draws up his troops on Epi
154
Attempt to supersede Dion through Gæsylus the Spartangood
163
Dion takes no step to realise any measure of popular liberty
169
Kallippus causes Dion to be assassinated
175
CHAPTER LXXXV
181
Lokridependency and residence of the younger Dionysius
186
Antecedent life and character of Timoleon
192
Different judgements of modern and ancient minds on the act
199
Public meeting in RhegiumTimoleon and the Carthaginians both
205
Timoleon at Tauromenium in Sicilyformidable strength of
207
Timoleon sends troops to occupy Ortygia receiving Dionysius into
213
Immense advantage derived by Timoleon from the possession
219
Timoleon masters Epipolæ and the whole city of Syracuse
226
Timoleon invites the Syracusans to demolish the Dionysian strong
233
Large body of new colonists assembled at Corinth for Sicily
239
Timoleon marches into the Carthaginian provinceomen about
245
Discouragement and terror among the defeated army as well
251
Timoleon attacks Hiketas at Leontini The place with Hiketas
257
Gratitude and reward to him by the Syracusans
262
Arrival of the blind Timoleon in the public assembly of Syracuse
269
Manner in which Timoleon bore contradiction in the public assent
270
Contrast of Dion and Timoleon
276
Corinth Sikyon c
282
Extinction of the free cities of Bæotia by the Thebansrepugnant
285
Philip as a youth at Thebesideas there acquiredfoundation laid
294
Proceedings of Philip against his numerous enemies His success
300
State of Eubæathe Thebans foment revolt and attack the island
306
The four cities declare themselves independent of Athensinter
313
Iphikrates is acquitted Timotheus is fined and retires from Athens
320
Expedition of CharesAthens makes peace with her revolted
326
Philip amuses the Athenians with false assuranceshe induces
333
CHAPTER LXXXVII
339
Active measures taken by Philomelus He goes to Spartaob
347
Philomelus tries to retain the prophetic agencyconduct of
351
Philomelus fortifies the templelevies numerous mercenaries
353
Onomarchus general of the Phokianshe renews the warhis
357
Activity and constant progress of Philiphe conquers Methône
363
Illsuccess of the Phokians in Boeotiadeath of Phayllus who
421
Philip carries on war in Thracebis intrigues among the Thracian
427
He insists on the necessity that citizens shall serve in person
435
no serious mea
443
Euboic and Olynthian Wars
446
129
447
Conquest and destruction of the Olynthian confederate towns
452
Disposition to magnify the practical effect of the speeches of
460
Just appreciation of the situation by Demosthenes He approaches
466
Courage of Demosthenes in combating the prevalent sentiment
472
Dionysiac festival at Athens in March 349 B C Insult offered
478
Hostilities in Eubea during 349348 B c
481
Three expeditions sent by Athens to Chalkidikê in 349348 B C
487
No other branch of the Athenian peaceestablishment was impo
494
CHAPTER LXXXIX
505
Æschines as envoy of Athens in Arcadia
510
Dion pardons Herakleideshis exposition of motives
516
Mission of the actor Aristodemus from the Athenians to Philip
518
Increased embarrassment at Athensuncertainty about Phalækus
524
Harangue addressed by Æschines to Philip about Amphipolis
530
Proceedings in the Athenian assembly after the return of
536
Philokrates moves to conclude peace and alliance with Philip
542
Assembly to provide ratification and swearing of the treaty
549
The oaths are taken before Antipater leaving out the Phokians
555
Consultations and dissensions among the Ten Athenian envoys
561
The envoys administer the oaths to Philip at Pheræ the last thing
567
The Athenian people believe the promises of Philokrates
574
News received at Thermopylæ of the determination of Athens
581
The Amphiktyonic assembly is convoked anew Rigorous sentence
588
This disgraceful peace was brought upon Athens by the corruption
597
From the Peace of 346 B C to the Battle of Chæroneia and
601
Reconquest of Phenicia by Ochusperfidy of the Sidonian prince
608
Disunion of the Grecian worldno Grecian city recognised as leader
614
Halonnesus taken and retakenreprisals between Philip and
620
Mission of Demosthenes to the Chersonese and Byzantiumhis
627
Athenshis lecture on the advantages of peace
633
Important reform effected by Demosthenes in the administration
639
His new reform distributes the burthen of trierarchy equitably
645
The Amphiktyons with the Delphian multitude march down
656
Special meeting of the Amphiktyons at Thermopylæ held without
663
Unfriendly relations subsisting between Athens and Thebes Hopes
669
partyeffect produced by the Macedonian envoys
676
Efficient and successful oratory of Demostheneshe persuades
677
auxiliaries which he procured
683
Battle of Chæroneiacomplete victory of Philip
690
Effect produced upon some of the islanders in the Ægean by
696
Honorary votes passed at Athens to Philip
703
Congress held at Corinth Philip is chosen chief of the Greeks
705
Pausaniasoutrage inflicted upon himhis resentment against
711
Character of Philip
717

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