Inside the Politics of Technology: Agency and Normativity in the Co-production of Technology and Society

Voorkant
Hans Harbers
Amsterdam University Press, 2005 - 308 pagina's
0 Recensies
Though the old saying claims that man is the measure of all things, the authors of Inside the Politics of Technology argue that the distinction implied between autonomous humans and neutral instruments of technology is an illusion. On the contrary, the technologies humans create simultaneously shape humans themselves.

By means of case studies of technologies as diverse as video cameras, electric cars, pregnancy tests, and genetic screenings, this volume considers the implications of this "co-production" of technology and society for our philosophical and political ideas. Are only humans endowed with social, political, and moral agency, or does our technology share those qualities? And if so, how should we understand—or practice—a politics of technology?
 

Wat mensen zeggen - Een review schrijven

We hebben geen recensies gevonden op de gebruikelijke plaatsen.

Overige edities - Alles weergeven

Veelvoorkomende woorden en zinsdelen

Populaire passages

Pagina 264 - In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was with God in the beginning. Through him all things were made; without him nothing was made that has been made.
Pagina 164 - ... appeared to be able to guarantee the authenticity of what was shown. But photographers in particular engaged in fierce discussions of what the medium could contribute to visual inquiry. In landscape photography, for example, cameras placed at a distance from one another were used on a large scale for the stereoscopy. The effect of the artificially increased distance between the lenses on the stereoscope was that the representation of the landscape displayed much more depth and the mountains were...
Pagina 123 - A technological regime is the rule-set or grammar embedded in a complex of engineering practices, production process technologies, product characteristics, skills and procedures, ways of handling relevant artefacts and persons, ways of defining problems; all of them embedded in institutions and infrastructures (Rip and Kemp, 1998: 340).
Pagina 164 - ... Herschel's words, the view is such as would be seen by a giant with eyes thousands of miles apart : after all, the stereoscope affords such a view as we should get if we possessed a perfect model of the moon...
Pagina 149 - ... are great shocks of yellow hair; fields of alfalfa, long green tresses; the towns, the steeples, and the trees perform a crazy mingling dance on the horizon; from time to time, a shadow, a shape, a spectre appears and disappears with lightning speed behind the window: it's a railway guard.
Pagina 63 - Taking the most obvious example, the atom bomb is an inherently political artifact. As long as it exists at all, its lethal properties demand that it be controlled by a centralized, rigidly hierarchical chain of command closed to all influences that might make its workings unpredictable. The internal social system of the bomb must be authoritarian; there is no other way.
Pagina 133 - ... motives, aspirations, political prejudices, and the rest, and they assume that morality, technology, science and economy will evolve in particular ways. A large part of the work of innovators is that of inscribing this vision of (or prediction about) the world in the technical content of the new object. I will call the end product of this work a "script
Pagina 279 - Gouldner, AW, and RA Peterson. (1962) Notes on technology and the moral order. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill. Hampson, JL (1965) Determinants of psychosexual orientation.
Pagina 133 - Designers thus define actors with specific tastes, competences, motives, aspirations, political prejudices, and the rest, and they assume that morality, technology, science, and economy will evolve in particular ways. A large part of the work of innovators is that of "inscribing" this vision of (or prediction about) the world in the technical content of the new object.
Pagina 46 - Which is why, though we cannot, to be sure, say very much about it, we do not wish to link a notion of agency to linguistic re-presentation. For signification — or so we have suggested — is more general than talk. It comes in all kinds of forms. And some, though only some, we can imagine. Others, no doubt, we will never know.

Over de auteur (2005)

Hans Harbers is associate professor at the faculty of philosophy of the University of Groningen.

Bibliografische gegevens