The Novels and Novelists of the Eighteenth Century: In Illustration of the Manners and Morals of the Age

Voorkant
J. Murray, 1871 - 347 pagina's
0 Recensies
Reviews worden niet geverifieerd, maar Google checkt wel op nepcontent en verwijdert zulke content als die wordt gevonden.

Vanuit het boek

Wat mensen zeggen - Een review schrijven

We hebben geen reviews gevonden op de gebruikelijke plaatsen.

Geselecteerde pagina's

Overige edities - Alles bekijken

Veelvoorkomende woorden en zinsdelen

Populaire passages

Pagina 327 - I may be allowed the expression, so long as you have an object. I mean, while the woman you love lives, and lives for you. All the privilege I claim for my own sex (it is not a very enviable one, you need not covet it), is that of loving longest, when existence or when hope is gone.
Pagina 219 - Why, Sir, if you were to read Richardson for the story, your impatience would be so much fretted that you would hang yourself. But you must read him for the sentiment, and consider the story as only giving occasion to the sentiment.
Pagina 108 - Campbell is a good man, a pious man. I am afraid he has not been in the inside of a church for many years * ; but he never passes a church without pulling off his hat. This shows that he has good principles.
Pagina 122 - ... than blemish his good qualities. As soon as the sermon is finished, nobody presumes to stir till Sir Roger is gone out of the church. The knight walks down from his seat in the chancel between a double row of his tenants, that stand bowing to him on each side ; and every now and then...
Pagina 23 - Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ; to whom, with the Father and the Holy Ghost, be all honour and glory, now and for ever. Amen.
Pagina 73 - I have been taken for a merchant upon the Exchange for above these ten years, and sometimes pass for a Jew in the assembly of stock-jobbers at Jonathan's. In short, wherever I see a cluster of people, I always mix with them, though I never open my lips but in my own club.
Pagina 333 - Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
Pagina 19 - Where then, ah! where, shall poverty reside, To 'scape the pressure of contiguous pride?
Pagina 78 - We got into the best order we could and marched to our barge, with a boat of French horns attending and little Ashe singing. We paraded some time up the river and at last debarked at Vauxhall. There if we had so pleased we might have had the vivacity of our party increased by a quarrel, for a Mrs Loyd, who is supposed to be married to Lord Haddington, seeing the two girls following Lady C.
Pagina 123 - ... upon, to his chaplain, because he thought he would be kind to him, and has left you all his books. He has, moreover, bequeathed to the chaplain a very pretty tenement with good lands about it. It being a very cold day when he made his will, he left for mourning, to every man in the parish, a great frieze coat, and to every woman a black ridinghood.

Bibliografische gegevens