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CASES. Texas vs. White, 7 Wallace, 700; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 302. White vs. Hart, 13 Wallace, 646; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 259. - Keith vs. Clark, 92 U. S., 461. Sprott vs. U. S., 20 Wallace, 459.

CONSTITUTIONAL DISCUSSIONS. J. Story, Commentaries (4th and 5th editions), §§ 351-357, 467-481; T. M. Cooley, Constitutional Law, 25-28; H. Von Holst, Constitutional Law, § 12; Constitutional History, I, 1-63; J. C. Hurd, Theory of our National Existence, 88, 105, 145, 286; J. Buchanan, The Administration on the Eve of the Rebellion, 86-98; W. O. Bateman, Political and Constitutional Law, 137-142; F. Wharton, Commentaries, §§ 374, 594n; W. Rawle, A View of the Constitution, 295-310; S. G. Fisher, Trial of the Constitution, 160, 167; J. Kent, Commentaries, §§ 201-221; J. I. C. Hare, American Constitutional Law, 64–93.

HISTORICAL DISCUSSIONS. (See Guide, §§ 205-208.) R. H. Dana, Wheaton's International Law, note 32; J. F. Rhodes, History of the United States, III; G. T. Curtis, Life of James Buchanan, II, ch. xv; J. T. Morse, Abraham Lincoln, I, ch. viii; H. Greely, The American Conflict, I, ch. xxii; J. J. Lalor, Cyclopaedia of Political Science, III, 693-702; J. W. Draper, History of the Civil War, I. chs. xxvii, xxviii; T. S. Goodwin, Natural History of Secession chs. xxvi, xxvii; Compte de Pais, History of the Civil War is America, I, 113-116; . A. Pollard, The Lost Cause, 84-80 Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Cnjederate Government, 1, 70-71, 168-177, 185-192; J. G. Blaine, Twenty Years 0, agre 1 x, xi; J. Schouler, History of the United States, V, ch. xiv; S. S. Cox, Three Decades of Federal Legislation, 101-108; H. Wilson, Rise and Fall of the Slave Power, III, 1-10, 109–126.

SPECIMEN QUESTIONS. Had Texas any greater constitutional right of secession than South Carolina? — Granting the right of secession, did Fort Sumter revert to South Carolina? - Did seceding states carry with them privileges gained by U. S. treaties?-Did Virginia reserve a right of secession in 1788?

§ 67. Paper No. 27: Means of executing the laws. [Cf. Papers Nos. 10, 28, 29.]

SOURCES. Constitution of the United States, Art. I, Sect. 4, § 2. Sect. 8, §§ 1, 2, 10, 11, 15, 16, 18, Sect. 9, § 6, Sect. 10, §§ 1-3; Art. IV, Sects. 2, 4; Art. VI, § 2. —T. Jefferson, Writings, II, 165, V, 38-41. -Buchanan's Message of Dec. 3, 1860 in Congressional Globe, 36 Cong., 2 Sess., Part I, 294–295, Part II, App. 1-4; J. Buchanan, The Administration on the Eve of the Rebellion, 108-134.-J. S. Black in Opinions of the Attorney General, IX,

516-526. - Gen. Scott's views in J. Buchanan, The Administration on the Eve of the Rebellion, 99-108.- South Carolina Correspondence in Congressional Globe, 36 Cong., 2 Sess., 817-819. — Lincoln's Views in American History Leaflets, Nos. 12, 18; in A. Lincoln, Complete Works, Ik, 32–33, 55–66; in Congressional Globe, 37 Cong., 1 Sess., App. 1-4. - D. Webster, Works, III, 448–505. J. C. Calhoun, Works, II, 262-309.- Acts of May 2, 1792, Feb. 28, 1795, March 3, 1807, July 29, 1861, May 31, 1870, April 20, 1871, in Statutes at Large, I, 264, 424; II, 443; XII, 281–282; XVI, 140-146; XVII, 13-15.

CASES. Martin vs. Mott, 12 Wheaton, 19; 7 Curtis, 10; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 2290.Luther vs. Borden, 7 Howard, 1; 17 Curtis, 1; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 192, 254, 2352, 2391.- Texas vs. White, 7 Wallace, 700; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 302. Houston vs. Moore, 5 Wheaton, 1; 4 Curtis, 535.- Marbury vs. Madison, 1 Cranch, 137; 1 Curtis, 368; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 107.-United States vs. Dunn, 120 U. S., 252. - Kendall vs. United States, 12 Peters, 524; 12 Curtis, 834. Prize Cases, 2 Black, 668; 4 Miller, 880; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 2339.1 Opinion of Attorneys General,

180-181.

CONSTITUTIONAL DISCUSSIONS. J. Story, Commentaries, §§ 490– 492, 1404, 1564, 1799-1801; T. M. Cooley, Constitutional Law (edition of 1880), 100; (edition of 1891), 103; Constitutional Limitations, 29; J. N. Pomeroy, Constitutional Law, §§ 121-150, 431– 436, 662-668; F. Wharton, Commentaries, §§ 378, 502-503; J. Kent, Commentaries, I, 283-284; H. Von Holst, Constitutional Law, §§ 11, 19, 44; W. O. Bateman, Political and Constitutional Law, §§ 122-124, 135, 247, 289; J. Davis, Rise and fall of the Confederate Government, I, 325–326; S. F. Miller, Lectures on the Constitution, 154–156; J. J. Lalor, Cyclopaedia of Political Science, II, 131–136, 542-546; III, 532; J. I. C. Hare, American Constitutional Law, 905-940; J. Tiffany, A Treatise on Government, 328-329

HISTORICAL DISCUSSIONS. (See Guide, $$ 208-210.) H. Von Holst, Constitutional History of the United States, I, ch. xii; VII. ch. ix; J. F. Rhodes, History of the United States since 1850, III; J. C. Ropes, Story of the Civil War, I, ch. ii; G. T. Curtis, Life of James Buchanan, II, 330–365; J. T. Morse, Abraham Lincoln, ch. viii; J. W. Draper, History of the Civil War, I, chs. xxi, xxxi; H. Greely, The American Conjunct, I, ch. xxiv; J. Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, I, 177–180, 251–258, 325– 328; A. H. Stephens, The War between the States, 1, 419-477;

J. Schouler, History of the United States, V, 479; W. G. Sumner,
Andrew Jackson, ch. x.
SPECIMEN QUESTIONS.

Could Buchanan constitutionally have sent a force to disperse the Montgomery government in Februrary, 1861? -Was there any remedy for the suspension of the United States Courts in South Carolina in December, 1860?—Could Lincoln constitutionally have ordered Anderson to arrest Gov. Pickens for treason in April, 1861?- Could Lincoln have delivered United States mails in Virginia under armed escort in July, 1861?

§ 68. Paper No. 28: War powers of the President. [Cf. Papers Nos. 10, 27, 30.]

SOURCES. Constitution of the United States, Preamble, Art. I, Sect. 1, Sect. 8, §§ 11, 15, Sect. 9, §§ 2, 6, Sect. 10, § 3; Art. II, Sect. 1, §§ 1, 7, Sect. 2, § 1, Sect. 3.—President Lincoln's Inaugural Message and Proclamations, in Works, II, 1-7, 11-22, 34-36, 239; in American History Leaflets, No. 12; in Annual Cyclopaedia (1861), 600-607; in Congressional Globe, 36 Cong., 2 Sess., 1433-1435; 37 Cong., 1 Sess., App. 1-4. - Speech of J. A. Bayard on Executive Usurpation in Congressional Globe, 37 Cong., 1 Sess., App. 12–19. -Speech of M. S. Latham in Congressional Globe, 37 Cong., 1 Sess., 19-22. Statute of July 13 and 22, 1861, in Statutes at Large, XII, 255, 268.

CASES. Ex parte Merryman, Taney's Reports, 246; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 2361.-Flemming vs. Page, 9 Howard, 603; 18 Curtis, 278. - United States vs. Eliason, 16 Peters, 291; 14 Curtis, 304. Mississippi vs. Johnson, 4 Wallace, 475; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 196. - Kendall vs. United States, 12 Peters, 524; 12 Curtis, 834. Martin vs. Mott, 12 Wheaton, 19; 7 Curtis, 10; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 2290.-Luther vs. Borden, 7 Howard, 1; 17 Curtis, 1; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 193, 254, 2352, 2391.—Texas vs. White, 7 Wallace, 700; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 302.-Houston vs. Moore, 5 Wheaton, 1; 4 Curtis, 535.-9 Opinion of Attorneys General, 524.

CONSTITUTIONAL DISCUSSIONS. J. Story, Commentaries, §§ 1329, 1564; J. N. Pomeroy, Constitutional Law, $$ 447-453, 662-668; H. Von Holst, Constitutional Law, §§ 11, 48; W. O. Bateman, Political and Constitutional Law, § 135; T. M. Cooley, Constitutional Law (edition of 1880), 100; (edition of 1891), 103; F. Wharton, Commentaries, §§ 378, 502–503; J. Kent, Commentaries, I, 283–284 ; S. F. Miller, Lectures on the Constitution, 154–156; J. I. C. Hare, American Constitutional Law, 905-940; J. Tiffany, A Treatise on Government, 328-329; J. J. Lalor, Cyclopaedia of Political Science, II, 131-136; W. A. Dunning, The Constitution of the United States,

in the Civil War, in Political Science Quarterly, I, 163-196; W. Whiting, War Powers under the Constitution of the United States, 66-82,.159-216.

HISTORICAL DISCUSSIONS. (See Guide, §§ 208-210.) J. F. Rhodes, History of the United States since 1850, III; G. T. Curtis, Life of James Buchanan, II, 330-365; J. C. Ropes, Story of the Civil War, I, chs. v-vii; J. T. Morse, Abraham Lincoln, I, chs. vii-viii; J. Davis, Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, I, 263–328; J. W. Draper, History of the Civil War, I, 558-567; E. A. Pollard, The Lost Cause, 103-111; H. Greely, The American Conflict, I, 428-458; A. H. Stephens, The War between the States, II, 34-44, 344-355; Compte de Paris, The Civil War in America, I, 140-148; J. G. Blaine, Twenty Years in Congress, I, 292–300.

SPECIMEN QUESTIONS. May a President carry on military operations without a declaration of war?- Could the President have arrested and confined a member of Congress during the Civil War? — Could the President order the confiscation of property as a war measure? Could the President suspend the operations of law of a loyal state, on the ground that it was an impediment to military operations?

§ 69. Paper No. 29: Questions of reconstruction. [Cf. Papers Nos. 22, 26, 27, 30.]

SOURCES. Constitution of the United States, Art. I, Sect. 2, §§ 3, 4, Sect. 3, §§ 1, 2, Sect. 4, § 1, Sect. 5, §§ 1, 2, Sect. 7, § 2, Sect. 10; Art. II, Sect. 2; Art. III, Sect. 2; Art. IV, Sect. 2, § 1, Sect. 3, § 1, Sect. 4; Art. V; Art. VI, § 2; Art. VII; Amends. IX; X; XIII-XV. Lincoln's Proclamation of Sept. 22, 1862, in Works, II. 239; in Annual Cyclopaedia (1861), 725-726; Proclamation of Jan. 1, 1863, in Works, II, 287-288.- Contemporary Speeches in Johnston, American Orations, III, 249-311.—Acts of April 9, 1866, July 16, 1866, March 2, 1867, March 23, 1867, July 19, 1867, June 22, 1868, June 25, 1868, July 6, 1868, July 25, 1868, in Statutes at Large, XIV, 37, 173, 428; XV, 2, 14, 72, 73, 83, 193.-Johnson's Vetoes in Congressional Globe, 39 Cong., 1 Sess., 168, 279, 1024; 39 Cong., 2 Sess., 563; 40 Cong., 1 Sess., 98, 232, 240; 40 Cong., 2 Sess., 699, 759, 900, 931.-E. McPherson, History of the Reconstruction, Pts. I, II.

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CASES. Mississippi vs. Johnson, 4 Wallace, 475; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 196. White vs. Hart, 13 Wallace, 646; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 259. Keith vs. Hart, 97 U. S. 461. - Texas vs. White, 7 Wallace, 700; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 302.

CONSTITUTIONAL DISCUSSIONS.

J. Story, Commentaries (Cooley edition), §§ 1915-1975; H. Von Holst, Constitutional Law, §§ 5 n., 13,

80; J. Tiffany, A Treatise on Government, 316–322; J. Ordronaux, Constitutional Legislation, 138–139; J. I. C. Hare, American Constitutional Law, 131, 509, 747, 948; T. M. Cooley, Constitutional Law (edition of 1880), 172, 173, 197; (edition of 1891), 178, 179, 205; E. C. Mason, The Veto Power, §§ 30, 34; W. A. Dunning, The Constitution of the United States in Reconstruction, in Political Science Quarterly, II, 558-602.

HISTORICAL DISCUSSIONS. (See Guide, §§ 215–217.) W. H. Barnes, History of the Thirty-Ninth Congress, chs. iii, vi–xiii, xvii-xx, xxii;~ Woodrow Wilson, Division and Reunion, §§ 124–142; J. L. Landon, Constitutional History and Government of the United States, 202–341; A. Johnston, History of the United States, 245-272; J. J. Lalor, Cyclopaedia of Political Science, III, 540–556; E. Stanwood, History of Presidential Elections, 236-276; S. Sterne, Constitutional History and Political Development of the United States, 200-207; E. L. Pierce, Life of Charles Sumner, III, ch. xxi; J. G. Blaine, Twenty Years in Congress, II, 3-465; H. Wilson, Rise and Fall of the Slave Power in America, III, 603-630.

SPECIMEN QUESTIONS. May a State forfeit its privileges in the Union while remaining a State of the Union? Could the two Houses of Congress refuse to admit Massachusetts Senators and Representatives to Congress? - May Congress divide a State which is in arms against the government without its consent? - Could Congress have affixed as a condition of the entrance of Utah into the Union that it ratify an amendment to the federal constitution prohibiting polygamy?

§ 70. Paper No. 30: The police power. [Cf. Papers Nos. 8, 18, 22, 29.] SOURCES.

Constitution of the United States, Art. I, Sect. 8, §§ 1, 3, 8, 18, Sect. 10, §§ 1, 2; Art. III, Sect. 2, § 1; Art. IV, Sect. 1, § 2, Sect. 3, § 2; Art. VI, § 2; Amends. IX; X; XI; XIV. Interstate Commerce Act of Feb. 7, 1887, Statutes at Large, XXIV, 379–387. — F. J. Stimson, American Statute Law, §§ 391–396, 462, 473-475, 510.

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CASES. Prigg vs. Pennsylvania, 16 Peters, 539; 14 Curtis, 417; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 476.- Civil Rights Cases, 109 U. S., 3; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 554.-Brown vs. Maryland, 12 Wheaton, 419; 7 Curtis, 262; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 1826. License Cases, 5 Howard, 504; 16 Curtis, 513; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 1851.-McGuire vs. Commonwealth, 3 Wallace, 387.-Beer Co. vs. Massachusetts, 97 U. S. 25; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 757.- Bowman vs. Chicago and Northwestern Railroad, 125 U. S. 465; J. B. Thayer, Cases, 2080.

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