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L. B. CLARKE, & M. T. C. GOULD,

STENOGRAPHERS,

NEW-YORK:

SOLD BY J. V. SEAMAN, 221 BROADWAY

1825.

[Copy Right Secured.]

A few words of explanation may be due frtom he stenographer to the public. He is aware that the ensuing discourses are neither completely full nor perfect ; but he is conscious that they have been reported with a faithful regard to the sentiments of the speakers, and he believes they will be found to contain no material errors. It is at all times difficult, not to say impossible, for the most expert stenographer to take the whole that a rapid speaker may pronounce in the course of a sermon. Some aid is usually derived from the memory, which has been less available to the reporter in the present case, from his entire unacquaintance with the speakers, or with their opinions, manner, or particular habits in delivery. These embarrassments have also been increased by the inconvenieney of writing without a table, and by the difficulty of hearing in a crowded gallery. On the whole however it is believed, they will be found to contain the spirit and substance of the sermons they profess to transmit, and carry with them in a great measure the manner and language in which they were delivered.

From a desire to express in as complete a manner as possible, the words and text of the speaker. He has thought best to make no grammatical corrections of their peculiarities of Phraseology ; but to exhibit them as nearly as possible to the Public in their own particular manner.

L. H. CLARKE,

M. T. C. GOULD, the reporter of the two last sermons, though subject to many of the inconveniences enumerated by his friend and Colleague, is not conscious of having made any material omission, even in the language of the speaker. This

may be attributed, in part, to a more intimate acquaintance with the style of Elias Hicks, having lately reported a volume of his sermons delivered in the city and vicinity of PHILADELPHIA. For the errors which may be discovered, bis apology will be found, in the language of L. H. CLARKE.

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SERMON I.

DELIVERED BY ELIAS HICKS, IN FRIENDS' MEETING

HOUSE, ROSE-STREET, NEW-YORK, ON FIRST DAY MORNING, THE 8TH OF FIFTH MONTH, 1825.

Since I have been sitting with you, I have been led to consider, not only from the records of history in past ages, but from our own observations and experience at the present day that it has been the practice of the children of men at all times, when an individual has been led to address a community, society, or nation, on any subject, moral or religious, to address them as a single person, as though all were in the same situation or predicament, in relation to the subject, to be commented upon. This is discoverable in the case of Elijah the prophet formerly. Driven, as it were from pillar to post, by Ahab, and Jezebel, being cast down and almost dicouraged, he went off to save his life, and retired into the wilderness, on account of the transgressions of the people. In this state of sequestration from mankind, he was addressed by his Almighty friend, on this wise, What dost thou here Elijah? To this the pro

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