The Principles of Economical Philosophy, Volume 2,Nummer 1

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Longmans, Green, Reader, and Dyer, 1875

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Inhoudsopgave

Error of Malthus on Rent
10
Smith on Rents in Shetland
13
Rent an example of the General Law of Value
20
Land reclaimed during the Revolutionary War
21
Cost of Production of Corn
22
Moderate farms let better than very large ones
23
Ricardo on Rent of Mines
24
Absurdity of the RicardoMill Theory of Rent
25
Refutation of Mill 234
26
Rent of Mines and Shops
27
Selfcontradiction of Mill on Rent
28
Anderson Ric do and Mill on Rent
29
Selfcontradiction of Ricardo
30
Smiths error on Labour as a Standard of Value
31
Exchangeability the sole essence of Wealth and Value
32
ON PROFITS PAGE 1 Definition of PROFIT and RATE OF PROFIT
35
Erroneous definition of Rate of Profit by Economists
36
Ricardos error on Rate of Profit
37
Error of Malthus on Rate of Profit
38
Error of Mill on Rate of Profit
39
Further examples of this
40
Examples of Rates of Profit
41
Examples of variations in the Rate of Profit
42
Examples of Rate of Profit
43
Smith on Apothecaries Profits
44
Value of pictures statues
45
Profits in country shops
46
Bacon on trade Profits
47
Cabs in London and provincial towns
48
Rate of Profit may differ although Profits are equal
49
Wages usually high when food
50
Mill controverts Smith
51
Examples of Value regulating Cost
52
Smith right Ricardo McCulloch and Mill wrong
53
Origin of demand for Banks and Paper Money
54
Examples of the Division of Labour
55
Selfcontradiction of Mill
56
Examples from Babbage
57
Explanation of a difficulty raised by Say
58
Large Capitals give smaller Profits than small Capitals
59
Smith wrongly calls Agricultural Labour the most productive
60
On Mills fourth proposition on Capital
61
Seniors description of Profits inadequate
62
Error of Physiocrates and Mill on Productive Labour
63
Unpopularity of Economics
64
The Droit au Travail
65
Error of Mill on Productive Labour
66
When Labour is productive
67
On Interest
68
Prejudices against Interest
69
Calvin on Interest
70
Final abolition of Usury Laws in England
72
Confusion of Mill on Value of Money
73
Value of Money has two meanings
74
Difference of Profit between Interest and Discount
76
On Rate of Interest
78
Rent and Interest analogous
79
Differences in Rate of Interest
80
Smith and Hume on Rate of Interest
83
Effect of increase of Money on Interest
87
How an increase of Money affects Prices and Interest
88
Hume on Rate of Interest
89
Effects of Banking on Interest
91
The Popes on Usury
93
CHAPTER XIII
100
Error of this doctrine
109
Productive Labour
115
Tue Wages Fund
123
Similar error of Ricardo
131
Smith on Wages
137
PAGE
140
144
144
History of Tithes
243
Origin of Tithes in England
247
Interest of the Clergy in Tithes
249
Tithe Commutation Acts
255
Policies of Insurance
257
On Rights of Expectation
258
Property in Ideas
269
No patent in a general principle
270
PATENTS
276
PAGE
278
GOODWILL of a business
279
TOLLS FERRIES and STREET CROSSINGS
280
CHAPTER XV
281
Error of Mills doctrine of International Values
284
DEFINITION of the Exchanges
286
Definition of PAR of EXCHANGE
288
Depreciation of the Coinage causes a Fall in the Foreign Exchanges
289
This disturbance of the Exchange expressed in two ways
290
The NoMINAL EXCHANGE and the REAL EXCHANGE
291
Rule to ascertain the true state of the Exchange when the Currency is depreciated
292
Par time of Exchange
294
On FOREIGN EXCHANGES
296
On the Limits of the VARIATION of the EXCHANGES
298
209
331
The same continued
342
The same continued
343
The same continued 314
344
The same continued
345
The essence of Lawism is that money represents commodities and that paper currency may be based upon commodities MONBY DOES NOT REPRE...
346
The theory of basing a paper currency upon commodities in volves the palpable contradiction in terms that a person may buy commodities and keep ...
347
Law was no advocate of an unlimited incontrovertible paper currency
348
Account of the French Assignats
350
The same continued
351
The same continued
352
The same continued
353
His extraordinary inconsistency
355
The same continued
356
Practical results of Laws theory
357
Fourth example of LawismThe Bank of Norway
358
Fifth exampleThe American banking convulsions of 18379
359
The principle of basing a paper currency on the public funds is identical with and is as vicious as basing it on land
360
Fundamental vice of the constitution of the Bank of England
361
The consequences of this vicious principle are prevented by its being limited to that single instance
362
COUNT OF MERCANTILE BILLS
363
This refutation incomplete
365
The same continued
367
Specific meaning of overissue
368
Fallacy of the expression good bills ? 99
369
Bullion as the representative of debt is the only proper basis upon which to found a paper currency
370
CHAPTER XVII
381
CHAPTER XVIII
435
Foundation of the Bank of England in 1694
447
Partial resumption of cash payments in 1816
455
Method adopted to carry them into effect
462
214
463
Stoppage of the Bank in 1797
486
The Bullion Committee condemn the RESTRICTIVE Theory
488
Peel adopts the RESTRICTIVE Theory in 1844
490
Failure of the RESTRICTIVE Theory in 1847 1857 and 1866
491
Uniform failure of the RESTRICTIVE Theory
492
Fundamental differences of Principle between the Bullion Report and the Bank Charter Act of 1844
493
Examination of the Arguments alleged in favour of main taining the Bank Act
495
The Rate of Discount the supreme power of controlling the Exchanges and the Paper Currency
500
The Directorate of the Bank
501
Mr Lowe on Commercial Crises
503
Errors of Peel
504
The Bank Act of 1844 has made all English Banking illegal
507
The Cheque Bank
510
An Inquiry into the Banking System necessary
515
CONCLUSION OF PURE ECONOMICS
520
227
The same continued

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Pagina 173 - In the progress of the division of labour, the employment of the far greater part of those who live by labour, that is, of the great body of the people, comes to be confined to a few very simple operations, frequently to one or two. But the understandings of the greater part of men are necessarily formed by their ordinary employments.

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