Memoirs by a Celebrated Literary and Political Character: From the Resignation of Sir Robert Walpole in 1742 to the Establishment of Lord Chatham's Second Administration in 1757 : Containing Strictures on Some of the Most Distinguished Men of that Time

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John Murray, 1814 - 164 pagina's
 

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Pagina 158 - He was an agreeable, eloquent speaker in parliament, but not without some little tincture of the pleader. " Men are apt to mistake, or at least to seem to rnfstake, their own talents, in hopes, perhaps, of misleading others to allow them that which they are conscious they do not possess. Thus Lord Hardwicke valued himself more upon being a great minister of state, which he certainly was not, than upon being a great magistrate, which he certainly was.
Pagina 54 - I meant the cause and the public. Both are given up. I feel for the honour of this country, when I see that there are not ten men in it who will unite and stand together upon any one question. But it is all alike, vile and contemptible.
Pagina 157 - Lord Granville," says the earl of Chesterfield, " had great parts, and a most uncommon share of learning for a man of quality. He was one of the best speakers in the house of lords, both in the declamatory and the argumentative way. He had a wonderful quickness and precision in seizing the stress of a question, which no art, no sophistry, could disguise in him.
Pagina 116 - Every person in the Fleet, who through Cowardice, Negligence, or Disaffection, shall in time of Action withdraw or keep back, or not come into the Fight or Engagement, or shall not do his utmost to take or destroy every Ship which it shall be his duty to engage, and to assist and relieve...
Pagina 156 - Profuse and appetent, his ambition was subservient to his desire of making a great fortune. He had more of the Mazarin than of the Richelieu. He would do mean things for profit, and never thought of doing great ones for glory.
Pagina 155 - In private life he was good-natured, cheerful, social ; inelegant in his manners, loose in his morals. He had a coarse, strong wit, which he was too free of for a man in his station, as it is always inconsistent with dignity. He was very able as a minister, but without a certain elevation of mind necessary for great good or great mischief. Profuse and appetent, his ambition was subservient to his desire of making a great fortune.
Pagina 160 - Argyle, though the weakest reasoner, was the most pleasing speaker I ever knew in my life. He charmed, he warmed, he forcibly ravished the audience ; not by his matter certainly, but by his manner of delivering it.
Pagina 156 - ... which engaged him to pass most of his leisure and jovial hours with people whose blasted characters reflected upon his own. He was loved by many, but respected by none; his familiar and illiberal mirth and raillery leaving him no dignity. He was not vindictive, but on the contrary very placable to those who had injured him the most. His...
Pagina 157 - LORD GRANVILLE had great parts, and a most uncommon share of learning for a man of quality. He was one of the best speakers in the House of Lords, both in the declamatory and the argumentative way. He had a wonderful quickness and precision in seizing the stress of a question, which no art, no sophistry, could disguise to him.
Pagina 50 - Gideon is dead," writes one of his contemporaries, in 1762, " worth more than the whole land of Canaan. He has left the reversion of all -his milk and honey, after his son and daughter, and their children, to the Duke of Devonshire, without insisting on the Duke taking his name, or being circumcised.

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