Animal Teeth and Human Tools: A Taphonomic Odyssey in Ice Age Siberia

Voorkant
Cambridge University Press, 11 jul. 2013 - 490 pagina's
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The culmination of more than a decade of fieldwork and related study, this unique book uses analyses of perimortem taphonomy in Ice Age Siberia to propose a new hypothesis for the peopling of the New World. The authors present evidence based on examinations of more than 9000 pieces of human and carnivore bone from 30 late Pleistocene archaeological and palaeontological sites, including cave and open locations, which span more than 2000 miles from the Ob River in the West to the Sea of Japan in the East. The observed bone damage signatures suggest that the conventional prehistory of Siberia needs revision and, in particular, that cave hyenas had a significant influence on the lives of Ice Age Siberians. The findings are supported by more than 250 photographs, which illustrate the bone damage described and provide a valuable insight into the context and landscape of the fieldwork for those unfamiliar with Siberia.
 

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Inhoudsopgave

What is perimortem taphonomy and why study it in Siberia?
1
An imaginary tale of winter death
11
Bone damage and its meaning
26
A few historical accounts of perimortem taphonomy
28
Definitions of 26 perimortem taphonomic variables
33
Piece selection
49
The 30 Siberian archaeological and paleontological sites distributed from the Ob River to the Sea of Japan
52
Afontova Gora
54
Kamenka
104
Kaminnaya Cave
120
KaraBom
133
Kirkalinskaya Cave
140
Krasny Yar
143
Kurla I
160
Malaya Seeya
164
Malta
173

Boisman II
60
Bolshoi Yakor I
69
Borabashevskaya
77
Denisova Cave
79
Dvuglaska Cave
90
Gosudarev Log I
101
analyses comparisons inferences and hypotheses
349
Conclusions for seven questions
404
Scientific names for Siberian Pleistocene species identified in one or more
453
References
460
Index
486
Copyright

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Over de auteur (2013)

Christy G. Turner, II is Regents' Professor Emeritus of the School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University. He is internationally recognised for his work on human dentition and, more recently, for his taphonomic studies of cannibalism in the American Southwest.

Nicolai D. Ovodov is Chief Research Collaborator at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, Novosibirsk, Russia. He is well-known in Russia for his important contributions to Siberian palaeontology and palaeoanthropology.

Olga V. Pavlova was a translator with the Russian Academy of Sciences for over 30 years in both the Institute of Geology and Geophysics and the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography.

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