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THE

ILI STORY

OF THE

MOST REMARKABLE LIFE AND EXTRAORDINARY ADVENTURES

OF THE

TRULY HONORABLE COLONEL JACQUE,

VULGARLY CALLED

COLONEL JACK;

WHO WAS BORN A GENTLEMAN,

PUT APPRENTICE TO A PICK-POCKET,

FLOURISHED SIX AND TWENTY YEARS AS A THIEF, AND WAS THEN KIDNAPPED TO VIRGINIA : CAME BACK A MERCHANT, WAS FIVE TIMES MARRIED TO FOUR WHORES, WENT INTO THE WARS, BEHAVED BRAVELY, GOT PREFERMENT, WAS MADE COLONEL OF A REGIMENT; RETURNED AGAIN TO ENGLAND, FOLLOWED THE FORTUNES OF THE CHEVALIER DE ST GEORGE, WAS TAKEN AT THE PRESTON REBELLION ; RECEIVED HIS PARDON FROM THE LATE KING, IS NOW AT THE HEAD OF HIS REGIMENT, IN THE SERVICE OF THE CZARINA, FIGHTING AGAINST

THE TURKS, COMPLETING A LIFE OF WONDERS,

AND RESOLVES TO DIE A GENERAL.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR J. BROTHERTON.

1722.

LONDON: REPRINTED BY CHARLES REYNELL,

LITTLE PULTENEY STREET.

MDCCCXL

PRE FACE.

Prefaces are so customary before books of this nature, to introduce them into the world by a display of their excellences, that it might be thought too presuming to send this performance abroad without some such preliminary. And yet I may venture to say it needs this good office as little as any that has ever gone before it. The pleasant and delightful part speaks for itself; the useful and instructive is so large, and has such a tendency to improve the mind and rectify the manners, that it would employ a volume large as itself to particularize the instructions that may be drawn from it.

Here is room for just and copious observations on the blessings and advantages of a sober and well-governed education, and the ruin of so many thousands of all ranks in this nation for want of it; here, also, we may see how much public schools and charities might be improved, to prevent the destruction of so many unhappy children, as, in this town, are every year bred up for the executioner.

The miserable condition of multitudes of youth, many of whose natural tempers are docible, and would lead them to learn the best things rather than the worst, is truly deplorable, and is abundantly seen in the history of this man's childhood; where, though circumstances formed him by necessity to be a thief, surprising rectitude of principles remained with him, and made him early abhor the worst part of his trade, and at length to forsake the whole of it. Had he come into the world with the advantage of a virtuous education, and been instructed how to improve the generous principles he had in him, what a fig're might he not have made, either as a man or a Christian.

The various turns of his fortune, in different scenes of life, make a delightful field for the reader to wander in ; a garden where he may gather wholesome and medicinal fruits, none noxious or poisonous ; where he will see virtue and the ways of wisdom everywhere applauded, honoured, encouraged, and rewarded ; vice and extravagance attended with sorrow, and every kind of infelicity; and at last, sin and shame going together, the offender meeting with reproach and contempt, and the crimes with detestation and punishment.

Every vicious reader will here be encouraged to a change, and it will appear that the best and only good end of an impious, misspent life is repentance; that in this there is comfort, peace, and oftentimes hope that the penitent shall be received like the prodigal, and his latter end be better than his beginning.

A book founded on so useful a plan, calculated to answer such valuable purposes as have been specified, cán require no apology; nor is it of any concern to the reader whether it be an exact historical relation of real facts, or whether the hero of it intended to present us, at least in part, with a moral romance. On either supposition, it is equally serviceable for the discouragement of vice and the recommendation of virtue.

DANIEL DE FOE.

THE

LIFE OF COLONEL JACK.

appear to be.

CHAPTER I.

| before a turn of fortune, if ever such a thing

happens to them, gives them a prospect of deINTRODUCTION.-I AM DESERTED BY MY PARENTS liverance. ALMOST AS SOON AS BORN. NICKNAMED BY MY

My nurse was as honest to the engagement she NURSE, COLONEL JACK, --CHARACTERS OF THE

had entered into as could be expected from one THREE JACKS-COLONEL JACK, CAPTAIN JACK,

of her employment, and particularly as honest as AND MAJOR JACK,--NURSE DIES, AND WE ARE

her circumstances would give her leave to be; TURNED LOOSE UPON THE WORLD. - CAPTAIN

for she bred me up very carefully with her own JACK FLOGGED FOR ROGUERY, -- WE PICK

son, and with another son of shame like me, who POCKETS.

she had taken upon the same terms. Seeing my life has been such a chequer work My name was John, as she told me, but neither of nature, and that I am able now to look back she or I knew anything of a sirname that beupon it from a safer distance than is ordinarily longed to me; so I was left to call myself Mr the fate of the clan to which I once belonged, I| Anything, what I pleased, as fortune and better think my history may find a place in the world, circumstances should give occasion. as well as some, which I see are every day read It happened that her own son (for she had a with pleasure, though they have in them nothing little boy of her own, about one year older than I) so diverting, or instructing, as I believe mine will was called John too; and about two years after

she took another son of shame, as I called it My original may be as high as anybody's for above, to keep as she did me, and his name was aught I know, for my mother kept very good John too. company, but that part belongs to her story more As we were all Johns, we were all Jacks, and than to mine ; all I know of it is by oral tradition. soon came to be called so; for at that part of the My nurse told me my mother was a gentlewoman, town where we had our breeding, viz. near that my father was a man of quality, and she (my Goodman's fields, the Johns are generally called nurse) had a good piece of money given her to | Jack ; but my nurse, who may be allowed to distake me off his hands, and deliver him and my l tinguish her own son a little from the rest, would mother from the importunities that usually attend have him called captain, because, forsooth, he was the misfortune of having a child to keep, that the eldest. should not be seen or heard of.

I was provoked at having this boy called capMy father, it seems, gave my nurse something || tain, and I cried, and told my nurse I would be more than was agreed for, at my mother's re called captain ; for she told me I was a gentle. quest, upon her solemn promise that she would man, and I would be a captain, that I would ; the use me well, and let me be put to school; and good woman, to keep the peace, told me, ay, ay, charged her, that if I lived to come to any big I was a gentleman, and therefore I should be ness, capable to understand the meaning of it, above a captain, for I should be a colonel, and that she should always take care to bid me remember was a great deal better than a captain ; for, my that I was a gentleman; and this, he said, was all dear, says she, every tarpawlin, if he gets but to the education he would desire of her for me; be lieutenant of a press smack, is called captain, for he did not doubt, he said, but that some time but colonels are soldiers, and none but gentle. or other, the very hint would inspire me with men are ever made colonels ; besides, says she, thoughts suitable to my birth, and that I would I have known colonels come to be lords and gecertainly act like a gentleman, if I believed my nerals, though they were bastards at first, and self to be so.

therefore you shall be called colonel. But my disasters were not directed to an end | Well, I was hushed indeed with this for the as soon as they began. It is very seldom'that present, but not thoroughly pleased, till a little the unfortunate are so but for å day; as the while after I heard her tell her own boy that I great rise by degrees of greatness to the pitch was a gentleman, and therefore he must call me of glory in which they shine, so the miscrable colonel ; at which her boy fell a crying, and he sink to the depth of their misery by a continued | would be called colonel. That part pleased me seriss of disaster, and are long in the tortures to the life, that he should cry to be called colonel, and agonies of their distressed circumstances, for then I was satisfied that it was above a cap

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