The Songs and Ballads of Cumberland: To which are Added Dialect and Other Poems; with Biographical Sketches, Notes, and Glossary

Voorkant
Sidney Gilpin
G. Routledge, 1866 - 560 pagina's
 

Wat mensen zeggen - Een review schrijven

We hebben geen reviews gevonden op de gebruikelijke plaatsen.

Geselecteerde pagina's

Inhoudsopgave

Overige edities - Alles weergeven

Veelvoorkomende woorden en zinsdelen

Populaire passages

Pagina 449 - Oft I had heard of Lucy Gray: And, when I crossed the wild, I chanced to see at break of day . The solitary child. No mate, no comrade Lucy knew; She dwelt on a wide moor, — The sweetest thing that ever grew Beside a human door!
Pagina 461 - For why ? because the good old rule Sufficeth them, — the simple plan, That they should take, who have the power, And they should keep, who can.
Pagina 448 - Than years of toiling reason : Our minds shall drink at every pore The spirit of the season. Some silent laws our hearts will make, Which they shall long obey: We for the year to come may take Our temper from to-day. And from the blessed power that rolls About, below, above, We'll frame the measure of our souls : They shall be tuned to love. Then come, my Sister ! come, I pray, With speed put on your woodland dress ; And bring no book : for this one day We'll give to idleness.
Pagina 451 - I HEARD a thousand blended notes, While in a grove I sat reclined, In that sweet mood when pleasant thoughts Bring sad thoughts to the mind.
Pagina 476 - They band his legs beneath the steed, They tied his hands behind his back; They guarded him, fivesome on each side, And they brought him ower the Liddel-rack. They led him thro...
Pagina 498 - WIT AND MIRTH ; or, PILLS TO PURGE MELANCHOLY. Being a Collection of the best Merry Ballads and Songs, Old and New. Fitted to all Humours, having each their proper Tune for either Voice or Instrument ; most of the Songs being new set.
Pagina 459 - THE COTTAGER TO HER INFANT. BY A FEMALE FRIEND. THE days are cold, the nights are long, The north-wind sings a doleful song ; Then hush again upon my breast ; All merry things are now at rest, Save thee, my pretty Love ! The kitten sleeps upon the hearth, The crickets long have ceased their mirth ; There's nothing stirring in the house Save one wee, hungry, nibbling mouse, Then why so busy thou ? Nay! start not at that sparkling light; 'Tis but the moon that shines so bright On the window-pane bedropped...
Pagina 455 - No — man is dear to man ; the poorest poor Long for some moments in a weary life •' When they can know and feel that they have been, Themselves, the fathers and the dealers out Of some small blessings ; have been kind to such As needed kindness, for this single cause, That we have all of us one human heart.
Pagina 506 - Nor think him all thy own. To-morrow, in the church to wed, Impatient, both prepare ! But know, fond maid ; and know, false man, That Lucy will be there ! " Then bear my corse, my comrades, bear, This bridegroom blithe to meet, He in his wedding-trim so gay, I in my winding-sheet.
Pagina 477 - And have they ta'en him, Kinmont Willie, Against the truce of Border tide? And forgotten that the bauld Buccleuch Is Keeper here on the Scottish side?

Bibliografische gegevens