Introduction to the Theory of Computation

Voorkant
Thomson Course Technology, 2006 - 437 pagina's
1 Reviewen
"Michael Sipser's philosophy in writing this book is simple: make the subject interesting and relevant, and the students will learn. His emphasis on unifying computer science theory - rather than offering a collection of low-level details - sets the book apart, as do his intuitive explanations. Throughout the book, Sipser - a noted authority on the theory of computation - builds students' knowledge of conceptual tools used in computer science, the aesthetic sense they need to create elegant systems, and the ability to think through problems on their own. INTRODUCTION TO THE THEORY OF COMPUTATION provides a mathematical treatment of computation theory grounded in theorems and proofs. Proofs are presented with a "proof idea" component to reveal the concepts underpinning the formalism. Algorithms are presented using prose instead of pseudocode to focus attention on the algorithms themselves, rather than on specific computational models. Topic coverage, terminology, and order of presentation are traditional for an upper-level course in computer science theory. Users of the Preliminary Edition (now out of print) will be interested to note several new chapters on complexity theory: Chapter 8 on space complexity; Chapter 9 on provable intractability, and Chapter 10 on advanced topics, including approximation algorithms, alternation, interactive proof systems, cryptography, and parallel computing." -- Publisher's description.

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Review: Introduction to the Theory of Computation

Gebruikersrecensie  - Chris Herdt - Goodreads

This was a surprisingly well-organized and well-written textbook. I consulted some additional texts on the subject during the course I was taking, but this book was superior to any of them. I would ... Volledige review lezen

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Over de auteur (2006)

Michael Sipser has taught theoretical computer science and other mathematical subjects at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for the past 25 years, where he is a professor of Applied Mathematics and a member of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). Currently, he is the head of the mathematics department. He enjoys teaching and pondering the many mysteries of complexity theory.

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