Pagina-afbeeldingen
PDF
ePub
[ocr errors]

UNIFORM EDITION OF

MARK TWAIN'S WORKS

Red Cloth. Crown 8vo.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE. Illustrated.
THE AMERICAN CLAIMANT, Etc.
A CONNECTICUT YANKEE. Illustrated.
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. Illustrated.
PRINCE AND PAUPER. Illustrated.

LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI. Illustrated.
THE MAN THAT CORRUPTED HADLEYBURG
Etc. Illustrated.

1.75

1.75

1.75

1.75

TOM SAWYER ABROAD, Etc. Illustrated.
.ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER. Illustrated. 1.75
PUDD'NHEAD WILSON. Illustrated.
.SKETCHES NEW AND OLD. Illustrated.
THE $30,000 BEQUEST, Etc. Illustrated.
INNOCENTS ABROAD. Illustrated.
ROUGHING IT. Illustrated.

1.75

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

-A TRAMP ABROAD. Illustrated.
THE GILDEd Age. Illustrated.
FOLLOWING THE EQUATOR.
JOAN OF ARC. Illustrated.

2.00

2.50

Illustrated.

In Half Leather, $1.25 per volume extra

Other Books by Mark Twain

A HORSE'S TALE. Illustrated.
EXTRACTS FROM ADAM'S DIARY.
EVE'S DIARY. Illustrated.
A DOG'S TALE. Illustrated.
THE JUMPING FROG. Illustrated.
HOW TO TELL A STORY, Etc.

A DOUBLE-BARRELLED DETECTIVE STORY.
Illustrated.

$1.75

1.75

1.75

1.75

1.75

1.75

Illustrated.

Copyright, 1897 and 1899, by

THE AMERICAN PUBLISHING COMPANY

Hartford, Conn.

$1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.50

1.50

Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1869, by
THE AMERICAN PUBLISHING COMPANY,

In the Clerk's Office of the District of Connecticut.

[ocr errors]

857

1771 W 2

To my most patient reader and most charitable

critic, my aged Mother, this volume is affectionately inscribed.

297348

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

IT

66

T is a common delusion of those who discuss contemporary literature that there is such an entity as the reading public," possessed of a certain uniformity of taste. There is not one public; there are many publics, as many in fact as there are different kinds of taste; and the extent of an author's popularity is in proportion to the number of these separate publics he may chance to please. Scott, for example, appealed not only to those who relished romance and enjoyed excitement, but also to those who appreciated his honest portrayal of sturdy characters. Thackeray is preferred by ambitious youth who are insidiously flattered by his tacit compliments to their knowledge of the world, by the disenchanted who cannot help seeing the petty meannesses of society, and by the less sophisticated in whom sentiment

has not gone to seed in sentimentality. Dickens in his own day bid for the approval of those who liked broad caricature (and were therefore pleased with Stiggins and Chadband), of those who fed greedily on plentiful pathos (and were therefore delighted with the deathbeds of Smike and Paul Dombey and Little Nell) and also of those who asked for unexpected adventure (and were therefore glad to disentangle the melodramatic intrigues of Ralph Nickleby).

In like manner the American author who has chosen to call himself Mark Twain has attained to an immense popularity because the qualities he possesses in a high degree appeal to so many and so widely varied publics,- first of all, no doubt, to the public that revels in hearty and robust fun, but also to the public which is glad to be swept along by the full current of adventure, which is sincerely touched by manly pathos, which is satisfied by vigorous and exact portrayal of character, and which respects shrewdness and wisdom and sanity and a healthy hatred of pretense and affectation and sham. Perhaps no one book of Mark Twain's-with the possible exception of 'Huckleberry Finn'— is equally a favorite with all his readers; and perhaps some of his best characteristics are absent from his earlier

« VorigeDoorgaan »