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In ghastly numbers—when assembled | Hurld down the altars of the living God, hordes, With all the infidel's intolerance.

191 Dragg’d from their hovels by despotic The last worst traitor triumphed — power,

triumph'd long, Rush'd o'er her frontiers, plunder'd her Secur'd by matchless villainy—by turns fair hamlets,

170

Defending and deserting each accomplice And sack'd her populous towns, and As interest prompted. In the goodly drench'd with blood

soil The reeking fields of Flanders.-- When Of Freedom, the foul tree of treason within,

struck Upon her vitals prey'd the rankling Its deep-fix'd roots, and dropt the dews tooth

of death Of treason ; and oppression, giant form, On all who slumber'd in its specious Trampling on freedom, left the alterna

shade. tive

He wove the web of treachery. He Of slavery, or of death. Even from that

caught day,

The listening crowd by his wild eloWhen, on the guilty Capet, I pronounced

quence,

200 The doom of injured France, has faction | His cool ferocity that persuaded murder, reared

Even whilst it spake of mercy !--never, Her hated head amongst us.

Roland

never preach'd

179

Shall this regenerated country wear Of mercy—the uxorious dotard Roland, The despot yoke. Though myriads The woman-govern'd Roland durst aspire

round assail, To govern France; and Petion talk'd And with worse fury urge this new of virtue,

crusade And Vergniaud's eloquence, like the

like the Than savages have known; though the honeyed tongue

leagued despots Of some soft Syren wooed us to destruc- | Depopulate all Europe, so to pour tion.

The accumulated mass upon our coasts, We triumphed over these. On the same Sublime amid the storm shall France scaffold

arise, Where the last Louis pour'd his guilty And like the rock amid surrounding blood,

waves

210 Fell Brissot's head, the womb of dark- Repel the rushing ocean.-She shall some treasons,

wield And Orleans, villain kinsman of the The thunder - bolt of vengeance-she Capet,

shall blast And Hébert's atheist crew, whose mad- The despot's pride, and liberate the dening hand

world!

FINIS

с

Q

WALLENSTEIN

A DRAMA IN TWO PARTS

TRANSLATED FROM THE GERMAN OF FREDERICK SCHILLER

1799-1800

THE PICCOLOMINI

DRAMATIS PERSONÆ OR THE FIRST PART OF WALLENSTEIN WALLENSTEIN, Duke of Friedland,

Generalissimo of the Imperiai A DRAMA IN FIVE ACTS

Forces in the Thirty-years' War. PREFACE OF THE TRANSLATOR

DUCHESS OF FRIEDLAND, Wife of Wal

lenstein. It was my intention to have prefixed a

THEKLA, her Daughter, Princess of Life of Wallenstein to this translation ;

Friedland. but I found that it must either have THE COUNTESS TERTSKY, Sister of the occupied a space wholly disproportionate

Duchess. to the nature of the publication, or have LADY NEUBRUNN.1 been merely a meagre catalogue of events OCTAVIO PICCOLOMINI, Lieutenantnarrated not more fully than they already

General. are in the Play itself. The recent trans

MAX PICCOLOMINI, his Son, Colonel of lation, likewise, of Schiller's History of

a Regiment of Cuirassiers. the Thirty Years' War diminished the

COUNT TERTSKY, the Commander of motives thereto. In the translation I

several Regiments, and Brotherendeavoured to render my Author liter

in-law of Wallenstein. ally wherever I was not prevented by Illo, Field Marshal, Wallenstein's Conabsolute differences of idiom ; but I am

fidant. conscious, that in two or three short

ISOLANI, General of the Croats. passages I have been guilty of dilating BUTLER, an Irishman, Commander of a the original ; and, from anxiety to give

Regiment of Dragoons. the full meaning, have weakened the

TIEFENBACH, force. In the metre I have availed my

DON MARADAS, Generals under Walself of no other liberties than those which

GOETZ,

lenstein, Schiller had permitted to himself, ex

KOLATTO, cept the occasional breaking-up of the

GORDON, Governor of Egra.1 line by the substitution of a trochee for

MAJOR GERALDIN.1 an iambic; of which liberty, so frequent CAPTAIN DEVEREUX.1 in our tragedies, I find no instance in these dramas. S. T. COLERIDGE.

1 Not mentioned in D.P. 1800.

1

20

-MACDONALD.1

Plunged down upon and seized, this NEUMANN, Captain of Cavalry, Aide- weighty prize !-de-camp to Tertsky.

We bring it hitherThe War Commissioner, Von QUESTEN. Illo.

Just in time to banquet BERG, Imperial Envoy.

The illustrious company assembled here. GENERAL WRANGEL, Swedish Envoy, Butler. 'Tis all alive! a stirring scene SWEDISH CAPTAIN.1

here ! BAPTISTA SENI, Astrologer.

Isolani.
Ay!

II BURGOMASTER of Egra.l

The very churches are all full of soldiers. ANSPESSADE of the Cuirassiers.

[Casts his eye round. GROOM OF THE

And in the Council-house, too, I obCHAMBER, belonging to the Duke.

serve, A PAGE,

You're settled, quite at home! Well, A CORNET. 2

well! we soldiers SEVERAL COLONELS AND GENERALS. 2 Must shift and suit us in what way we can. PAGES AND ATTENDANTS belonging to

Illo. We have the Colonels here of Walenstein,

thirty regiments. ATTENDANTS AND HOBÖlsts belonging You'll find Count Tertsky here, and to Tertsky.2

Tiefenbach, THE MASTER OF THE CELLARS to Count Kolatto, Goetz, Maradas, Hinnersam,

, Tertsky. 2

The Piccolomini, both son and fatherVALET DE CHAMBRE of Count Piccolo- You'll meet with many an unexpected mini 2

greeting CUIRASSIERS, DRAGOONS, SERVANTS. 1 From many an old friend and acquaint

ance. Only

Galas is wanting still, and Altringer. THE PICCOLOMINI, ETC. Butler. Expect not Galas.

Illo (hesitating). How so? Do you ACT I

know

Isolani (interrupting him). Max PicSCENE I

colomini here?-O bring me to An old Gothic Chamber in the Council

him. House at Pilsen, decorated with Colours

I see him yet, ('tis now ten years ago, and other War Insignia.

We were engaged with Mansfeld hard

by Dessau) ILLO with BUTLER and ISOLANI. I see the youth, in my mind's eye I see

him, Illo. Ye have come late—but ye are

Leap his black war-horse from the bridge come! The distance,

adown, Count Isolan, excuses your delay.

And t'ward his father, then in extreme Isolani. Add this too, that we come

peril,

30 not empty-handed.

Beat up against the strong tide of the At Donauwert3 it was reported to us,

Elbe. A Swedish caravan was on its way

The down was scarce upon his chin ! I Transporting a rich cargo of provision,

hear Almost six hundred waggons. This my

He has made good the promise of his Croats

youth, 1 Not mentioned in D.P. 1800.

And the full hero now is finished in him. 2 Not mentioned in D.P. after 1800.

Illo. You'll see him yet ere evening. 3 A town about 12 German miles N.E. of Ulm.

He conducts

70

The Duchess Friedland hither, and the To the whole corps, if once in their Princess 1

remembrance From Carnthen. We expect them here An old deserving soldier makes his way. at noon.

Butler. I am perplexed and doubtful, Butler. Both wife and daughter does

whether or no the Duke call hither ?

I dare accept this your congratulation. He crowds in visitants from all sides. The Emperor has not yet confirmed the Isolani.

Hm!

appointment. So much the better! I had framed my Isolani. Seize it, friend! Seize it! The mind

hand which in that post

40 To hear of nought but warlike circum- Placed you, is strong enough to keep you stance,

there, Of marches, and attacks, and batteries : Spite of the Emperor and his Ministers ! And lo ! the Duke provides, that some- Illo. Ay, if we would but so consider thing too

it ! Of gentler sort, and lovely, should be If we would all of us consider it so ! present

The Emperor gives us nothing ; from the To feast our eyes.

Duke Illo (who has been standing in the at- Comes all—whate'er we hope, whate'er titude of meditation, to Butler,

we have. whom he leads a little on one side). Isolani (to Illo). My noble brother! And how came you to know

did I tell you how That the Count Galas joins us not? The Duke will satisfy my creditors ? Butler.

Because Will be himself my banker for the future, He importuned me to remain behind. Make me once more a creditable man ! Illo (with warmth). And you ?—You And this is now the third time, think of hold out firmly?

that! [Grasping his hand with affection. This kingly-minded man has rescued me

Noble Butler ! From absolute ruin, and restored my Butler. After the obligation which the

honour. Duke

50

Illo. O that his power but kept pace Had layed so newly on me

with his wishes! Illo.

I had forgotten Why, friend ! he'd give the whole world A pleasant duty-Major-General,

to his soldiers. I wish you joy!

But at Vienna, brother ! here's the grievIsolani. What, you mean, of his regi

ance !ment?

What politic schemes do they not lay to I hear, too, that to make the gift still

shorten sweeter,

His arm, and, where they can, to clip The Duke has given him the very same

his pinions. In which he first saw service, and since Then these new dainty requisitions ! then,

these, Worked himself

, step by step, through which this same Questenberg brings each preferment,

hither !From the ranks upwards. And verily, Butler.

Ay, it gives

These requisitions of the Emperor, A precedent of hope, a spur of action 60 I too have heard about them ; but I 1 The Dukes in Germany being always reign

hope ing powers, their sons and daughters are entitled

The Duke will not draw back a single Princes and Princesses.

inch !

80

Illo. Not from his right most surely, Questenberg (to Octavio). And lo ! unless first

90

betwixt them both experienced -From office !

Prudence ! Butler (shocked and confused). Know Octavio (presenting Questenberg to

you aught then? You alarm me. Butler and Isolani). The ChamIsolani (at the same time with Butler,

berlain and War-commissioner and in a hurrying voice). We

Questenberg, should be ruined, every one of us ! The bearer of the Emperor's behests, Illo.

No more ! The long-tried friend and patron of all Yonder I see our worthy friend 1 ap

soldiers, proaching

We honour in this noble visitor. With the Lieutenant-General, Piccolo

[Universal silence. mini.

Illo (moving towards Questenberg). Butler (shaking his head significantly).

'Tis not the first time, noble I fear we shall not go hence as

Minister,
we came.

You have shewn our camp this honour.
Questenberg

Once before
I stood before these colours.

20 SCENE II

Illo. Perchance too you remember

where that was. Enter OCTAVIO PICCOLOMINI and

It was at Znäim 1 in Moravia, where QUESTENBERG

You did present yourself upon the part Octavio (still in the distance). Ay, That he would straight assume the chief

Of the Emperor, to supplicate our Duke ay ! more still! Still more new

command. visitors!

Questenberg. To supplicate ? Nay, Acknowledge, friend ! that never was a

noble General ! camp, Which held at once so many heads of

So far extended neither my commission

(At least to my own knowledge) nor my heroes. [Approaching nearer.

zeal. Welcome, Count Isolani !

Illo. Well, well, then-to compel Isolani. My noble brother,

him, if you chuse. Even now am I arrived ; it had been else my duty

I can remember me right well, Count

Tilly Octavio. And Colonel Butler--trust

Had suffered total rout upon the Lech. me, I rejoice

Bavaria lay all open to the enemy, Thus to renew acquaintance with a man

Whom there was nothing to delay from Whose worth and services I know and honour.

pressing

Onwards into the very heart of Austria. See, see, my friend !

At that time you and Werdenberg apThere might we place at once before our

peared eyes The sum of war's whole trade and mys

Before our General, storming him with tery

prayers, [TO QUESTENBERG, presenting Unless he took compassion on this

And menacing the Emperor's displeasure, BUTLER and ISOLANI at the

wretchedness. same time to him, These two the total sum-Strength and

Isolani (steps up to them). Yes, yes,

'tis comprehensible enough, Dispatch.

A town not far from the Mine-mountains, on 1 Spoken with a sneer.

the high road from Vienna to Prague.

30

IO

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