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and graces,

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Wherefore with your commission of to

[Examining with his eye the day

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dress and ornaments of QUESYou were not all too willing to remember

TENBERG.
Your former one.

Good store of gold that still remains un-
Questenberg. Why not, Count Isolan ?

coined. No contradiction sure exists between Questenberg. Thank Heaven! that them.

means have been found out to It was the urgent business of that time

hide

70 To snatch Bavaria from her enemy's hand; | Some little from the fingers of the Croats. ;

. And my commission of to-day instructs Illo. There ! The Stawata and the me

Martinitz,
To free her from her good friends and On whom the Emperor heaps his gifts

protectors.
Illo. A worthy office ! After with To the heart-burning of all good Bohe-
our blood

miansWe have wrested this Bohemia from the Those minions of court favour, those Saxon,

court harpies, To be swept out of it is all our Who fatten on the wrecks of citizens thanks,

Driven from their house and home-who The sole reward of all our hard-won vic

reap no harvests tories.

Save in the general calamityQuestenberg. Unless that wretched Who now, with kingly pomp, insult and land be doomed to suffer

mock Only a change of evils, it must be The desolation of their country--these, Freed from the scourge alike of friend Let these, and such as these, support the and foe.

war,

81 Illo. What? 'Twas a favourable year; The fatal war, which they alone enthe Boors

kindled ! Can answer fresh demands already.

Butler. And those state-parasites, Questenberg:

Nay,

who have their feet If you discourse of herds and meadow. Soconstantly beneath the Emperor's table, grounds

Who cannot let a benefice fall, but Isolani. The war maintains the war.

they Are the Boors ruined,

Snap at it with dog's hunger—they, forThe Emperor gains so many more new

sooth, soldiers.

60 Would pare the soldier's bread, and Questenberg. And is the poorer by cross his reckoning! even so many subjects.

Isolani. My life long will it anger Isolani. Poh! We are all his sub

me to think, jects.

How when I went to court seven years Questenberg. Yet with a difference,

ago, General ! The one fill

To see about new horses for our regiWith profitable industry the purse,

ment,

90 The others are well skilled to empty it. llow from one antechamber to another The sword has made the Emperor poor ; They dragged me on, and left me by the the plough

hour Must reinvigorate his resources.

To kick my heels among a crowd of Isolani.

Sure !

simpering Times are not yet so bad. Methinks I Feast-fattened slaves, as if I had come see

thither

Questenberg. His cares and feelings

all ranks share alike, Nor will he offer one up to another. Isolani. And therefore thrusts he us

into the deserts As beasts of prey, that so he may pre

serve

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A mendicant suitor for the crumbs of

favour That fall beneath their tables. And, at

last, Whom should they send me but a Capu

chin! Straight I began to muster up my sins For absolution-but no such luck for me! This was the man, this Capuchin, with

whom I was to treat concerning the army horses: And I was forced at last to quit the

field, The business unaccomplished. After

wards The Duke procured me in three days,

what I Could not obtain in thirty at Vienna. Questenberg. Yes, yes ! your travel

ling bills soon found their way to

us : Too well I know we have still accounts

to settle. Illo. War is a violent trade; one

cannot always Finish one's work by soft means ; every

trifle Must not be blackened into sacrilege. 110 If we should wait till you, in solemn

council, With due deliberation had selected The smallest out of four-and-twenty evils, I'faith, we should wait long.--Dash ! and through with it!' - That's

the better watch-word. Then after come what may come.

'Tis man's nature To make the best of a bad thing once

past. A bitter and perplexed “what shall I

do? Is worse to man then worst necessity. Questenberg. Ay, doubtless, it is true :

the Duke does spare us The troublesome task of chusing. Butler.

Yes, the Duke Cares with a father's feelings for his

troops; But how the Emperor feels for us, we

see.

His dear sheep fattening in his fields at

home. Questenberg (with a sneer). Count,

this comparison you make, not I. Butler. Why, were we all the Court supposes us,

130 "Twere dangerous, sure, to give us

liberty. Questenberg. You have taken liberty

-it was not given you. And therefore it becomes an urgent duty To rein it in with curbs. Octavio (interposing and addressing

Questenberg). My noble friend, This is no more than a remembrancing That you are now in camp, and among

warriors. The soldier's boldness constitutes his

freedom. Could he act daringly, unless he dared Talk even so ? One runs into the other. The boldness of this worthy officer, 140

[pointing to BUTLER. Which now has but mistaken in its

mark, Preserved, when nought but boldness

could preserve it, To the Emperor his capital city, Prague, In a most formidable mutiny of the whole garrison.

[Military music at a distance, Hah! here they come ! Illo. The sentries are saluting them :

this signal Announces the arrival of the Duchess. Octavio (to Questenberg). Then my son

Max too has returned. 'Twas he Fetched and attended them from Carnthen hither.

150 Isolani (to Illo). Shall we not go in

company to greet them? Illo. Well, let us go.--Ho! Colonel

Butler, come.

I 20

30

[To OCTAVIO. Here is no Emperor more-the Duke is You'll not forget, that yet ere noon we

Emperor. meet

Alas, my friend ! alas, my noble friend! The noble Envoy at the General's palace. This walk which you have ta'en me

[Exeunt all but QUESTENBERG through the camp
and OCTAVIO.

Strikes my hopes prostrate.
Octavio.

Now you see yourself
Of what a perilous kind the office is,

Which
SCENE III

you deliver to me from the Court.

The least suspicion of the General QUESTENBERG and OCTAVIO. Costs me my freedom and my life, and

would Questenberg (with signs of aversion But hasten his most desperate enterprise.

and astonishment). What have I Questenberg. Where was our reason not been forced to hear, Octavio !

sleeping when we trusted What sentiments ! what fierce, uncurbed This madman with the sword, and defiance !

placed such power And were this spirit universal

In such a hand ? I tell you, he'll refuse, Octavio.

Hm! Flatly refuse, to obey the Imperial You are now acquainted with three

orders. fourths of the army.

Friend, he can do't, and what he can, Questenberg. Where must we seek then

he will. for a second host

And then the impunity of his defianceTo have the custody of this? That 0! what a proclamation of our weakIllo

ness! Thinks worse, I fear me, than he speaks. Octavio. D'ye think too, he has And then

brought his wife and daughter This Butler too—he cannot even con- Without a purpose hither? Here in ceal

camp ! The passionate workings of his ill inten- And at the very point of time, in which tions.

We're arming for the war? That he has Octavio. Quickness of temper - irri

taken tated pride;

These, the last pledges of his loyalty, 'Twas nothing more.

I cannot give up Away from out the Emperor's domainsButler.

This is no doubtful token of the nearI know a spell that will soon dispossess The evil spirit in him.

Of some eruption ! Questenberg (walking up and down in Questenberg. How shall we hold footevident disquiet). Friend, friend !

ing 0! this is worse, far worse, than we had Beneath this tempest, which collects suffered

itself Ourselves to dream of at Vienna. There And threats us from all quarters? The We saw it only with a courtier's eyes,

enemy Eyes dazzled by the splendour of the Of the empire on our borders, now throne.

already We had not seen the War-chief, the Com- The master of the Danube, and still mander,

farther, The man all - powerful in his camp. And farther still, extending every hour ! Here, here,

In our interior the alarum-bells 'Tis quite another thing.

Of insurrection--peasantry in arms—

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IO

ness

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All orders discontented—and the army, To hide my genuine feelings from him, Just in the moment of our expectation

yet Of aidance from it-lo! this very army Ne'er have I duped him with base Seduced, run wild, lost to all discipline,

counterfeits ! Loosened, and rent asunder from the Questenberg. It is the visible ordinance state

of heaven. And from their sovereign, the blind

Octavio. I know not what it is that instrument

so attracts Of the most daring of mankind, a weapon And links him both to me and to my Of fearful power, which at his will he

son. wields !

Comrades and friends we always wereOctavio. Nay, nay, friend ! let us not

long habit, despair too soon,

бо Adventurous deeds performed in com. Men's words are ever bolder than their

pany.

90 deeds :

And all those many and various incidents And many a resolute, who now appears Which store a soldier's memory with Made up to all extremes, will, on a

affections, sudden

Had bound us long and early to each Find in his breast a heart he wot

othernot of,

Yet I can name the day, when all at Let but a single honest man speak out

once The true name of his crime! Remem- His heart rose on me, and his confidence ber, too,

Shot out in sudden growth. It was the We stand not yet so wholly unprotected.

morning Counts Altringer and Galas have main- Before the memorable fight at Lützner. tained

Urged by an ugly dream, I sought him Their little army faithful to its duty,

out, And daily it becomes more numerous. 70 To press him to accept another charger. Nor can he take us by surprize : you At distance from the tents, beneath a tree, know,

I found him in a sleep. When I had I hold him all-encompassed by my lis

waked him, teners.

And had related all my bodings to him, Whate'er he does, is mine, even while Long time he stared upon me, like a 'tis doing

man No step so small, but instantly I hear it; Astounded ; thereon fell upon my neck, Yea, his own mouth discloses it.

And manifested to me an emotion Questenberg:

'Tis quite That far outstripped the worth of that Incomprehensible, that he detects not

small service. The foe so near !

Since then his confidence has followed Octavio. Beware, you do not think,

me That I by lying arts, and complaisant With the same pace that mine has fled Hypocrisy, have skulked into his graces :

from him. Or with the sustenance of smooth pro- Questenberg: You lead your son into fessions

80

the secret ? Nourish his all - confiding friendship ! Octavio.

No!
No-

Questenberg. What? and not warn Compelled alike by prudence, and that him either what bad hands

ΙΙο duty

His lot has placed him in ? Which we all owe our country, and our Octavio.

I must perforce sovereign,

Leave him in wardship to his innocence.

IOI

21

His young and open soul-dissimulation Beaming protection, shine above her Is foreign to its habits ! Ignorance

hosts. Alone can keep alive the cheerful air, Max. Heh! Noble minister! You The unembarrassed sense and light free

miss your part. spirit,

You came not here to act a panegyric. That make the Duke secure.

You're sent, I know, to find fault and to Questenberg (anxiously). My honoured

scold usfriend ! most highly do I deem I must not be beforehand with my comOf Colonel Piccolomini-yet-if

rades. Reflect a little

Octavio (to Nax). He comes from Octavio. I must venture it. 120

court, where people are not quite Hush !—There he comes !

So well contented with the duke, as

here.

Alax. What now have they contrived SCENE IV

to find out in him ? MAX PICCOLOMINI, OCTAVIO PICCO

That he alone determines for himself LOMINI, QUESTENBERG.

What he himself alone doth understand ?

Well, therein he does right, and will Max. Ha ! there he is himself. Wel

persist in't. come, my father !

Heaven never meant him for that passive [He embraces his father. As he thing

turns round, he observes That can be struck and hammered out to QUESTENBERG, and draws

suit back with a cold and reserved Another's taste and fancy. He'll not air.

dance You are engaged, I see. I'll not disturb To every tune of every minister. you.

It goes against his nature--he can't do Octavio. How, Max? Look closer at

it.

30 this visitor ;

He is possessed by a commanding spirit, Attention, Max, an old friend merits- And his too is the station of command. Reverence

And well for us it is so ! There exist Belongs of right to the envoy of your Few fit to rule themselves, but few that sovereign.

use Max (drily). Von Questenberg ! Their intellects intelligently.--Then

Welcome-if you bring with you Well for the whole, if there be found a Aught good to our head quarters.

man, Questenberg (seising his hand). Nay, Who makes himself what nature destined draw not

him, Your hand away, Count Piccolomini ! The pause, the central point to thousand Not on mine own account alone I seized

thousands it,

Stands fixed and stately, like a firmAnd nothing common will I say there

built column, with. [Taking the hands of both. Where all may press with joy and conOctavio-Max Piccolomini !

fidence. O saviour names, and full of happy Now such a man is Wallenstein ; and if omen!

Another better suits the court Ne'er will her prosperous genius turn

other from Austria,

But such a one as he can serve the While two such stars, with blessed in

army. fluences

Questenberg. The army? Doubtless !

II

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no

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