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B.

With a sadness at heart, and an earWhy, then we and the Gods are equally nest hope grounded on his misanthropic blest,

sadness, when I first knew him in his And Olympus an Ale-house as good as 20th or 21st year, that a something the best !

existed in his bodily organism that in M. Post, Sep. 18, 1801.

the sight of the All-Merciful lessened his responsibility, and the moral imputation

of his acts and feelings.
24

MS.
EPITAPH

26

ON A BAD MAN

DRINKING VERSUS THINKING

OR, A SONG AGAINST THE NEW

PHILOSOPHY

OF him that in this gorgeous tomb doth

lie This sad brief tale is all that Truth

can give-He lived like one who never thought to

die, He died like one who dared not hope

to live! M. Post, Sep. 22, 1801.

Εστησε. .

25 UNDER this stone does Walter Harcourt

lie, Who valued nought that God or man

could give ; He lived as if he never thought to die; He died as if he dared not hope to

live ! [So reprinted by Mrs. H. N. Coleridge in Essays on his own Times as ' Another Version'; with this foot-note: 'The name Walter Har. court has been supplied by the Editor, S. C.' The following adaptation is now first printed from S. T. C.'s papers.-Ed.]

My Merry men all, that drink with glee
This fanciful Philosophy,

Pray tell me what good is it?
If antient Nick should come and take
The same across the Stygian Lake,

I guess we ne'er should miss it.
Away, each pale, self-brooding spark
That goes truth-hunting in the dark,

Away from our carousing !
To Pallas we resign such fowls-
Grave birds of wisdom ! ye’re but owls,

And all your trade but mousing !
My Merry men all, here's punch and

wine,
And spicy bishop, drink divine !

Let's live while we are able.
While Mirth and Sense sit, hand in

glove,
This Don Philosophy we'll shove

Dead drunk beneath the table !
M. Post, Sep. 25, 1801.

OBIIT SATURDAY, SEPT. 10, 1830.

27

W. H. EHEU!

A HINT TO PREMIERS AND

FIRST CONSULS

FROM AN OLD TRAGEDY, VIZ. AGATHA

TO KING ARCHELAUS

BENEATH this stone does William Hazlitt

lie, Thankless of all that God or man

could give. He lived like one who never thought to

die, He died like one who dared not hope

THREE truths should make thee often

think and pause ; The first is, that thou govern’st over The second, that thy power is from the

to live. Sept. 30, 1830.

men ;

32 laws; And this the third, that thou must To wed a fool, I really cannot see die !-and then ?

Why thou, Eliza, art so very loth ; M. Post, Sep. 27, 1801.

Still on a par with other pairs you'd be,

Since thou hast wit and sense enough for 28

both.
TO A CERTAIN MODERN

Morn. Post, Dec. 26, 1801.
NARCISSUS

[The twenty Original Epigrams' folDo call, dear Jess, whene'er my way you lowing were printed in the Morning Post come ;

in September and October 1802, with My looking-glass will always be at home.

the signature ESTHEE.'] M. Post, Dec. 16, 1801.

(September 23, 1802.)

33
29
TO A CRITIC

What is an Epigram? a dwarfish whole,

Its body brevity, and wit its soul.
WHO EXTRACTED A PASSAGE FROM A
POEM WITHOUT ADDING A WORD RE-

34
SPECTING THE CONTEXT, AND THEN
DERIDED IT AS UNINTELLIGIBLE.

CHARLES, grave or merry, at no lie

would stick, Most candid critic, what if I,

And taught at length his memory the By way of joke, pull out your eye, And holding up the fragment, cry,

same trick. · Ha ! ha! that men such fools should

Believing thus what he so oft repeats

He's brought the thing to such a pass, be ! Behold this shapeless Dab !--and he

poor youth,

That now himself and no one else Who own'd it, fancied it could see !'

he cheats, The joke were mighty analytic,

Save when unluckily he tells the truth. But should you like it, candid critic? M. Post, Dec. 16, 1801.

35 30

An evil spirit's on thee, friend ! of late ! ALWAYS AUDIBLE

Ev'n from the hour thou cam'st to thy

Estate. Pass under Jack's window at twelve at

Thy mirth all gone, thy kindness, thy night,

discretion, You'll hear him still-he's roaring! Pass under Jack's window at twelve at

Th' estate hath prov'd to thee a most

complete possession. noon, You'll hear him still--he's snoring!

Shame, shame, old friend ! would'st thou

be truly blest, Morn. Post, Dec. 19, 1801.

Be thy wealth's Lord, not slave! pos31

sessor, not possess'd. PONDERE NON NUMERO FRIENDS should be weigh’d, not told ; who boasts to have won

HERE lies the Devil—ask no other name. A multitude of friends, he ne'er had one. Well— but you mean Lord-M? Hush! Morn. Post, Dec. 26, 1801.

we mean the same.

36

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43 IN vain I praise thee, Zoilus !

In vain thou rail'st at me! Me no one credits, Zoilus !

And no one credits thee!

(October 9, 1802.)

44

39 OLD HARPY jeers at castles in the air, And thanks his stars, whenever

Edmund speaks, That such a dupe as that is not his

heirBut know, old Harpy! that these

fancy freaks, Though vain and light, as floating

gossamer, Always amuse, and sometimes mend the

heart : A young man's idlest hopes are still

his pleasures, And fetch a higher price in Wisdom's

mart Than all the unenjoying Miser's

treasures.

EPITAPH ON A MERCENARY

MISER

A poor benighted Pedlar knock'd

One night at SELL-ALL's door,
The same who saved old SELL-ALL'S

life--
'Twas but the year before !
And Sell-all rose and let him in,

Not utterly unwilling,
But first he bargain'd with the man,

And took his only shilling!
That night he dreamt he'd given away

his pelf,

40 TO A VAIN YOUNG LADY Dinst thou think less of thy dear self

Far more would others think of thee!

48

Walk'd in his sleep, and sleeping hung himself!

FROM AN OLD GERMAN POET And now his soul and body rest below; And here they say his punishment and

[WERNICKE] fate is

THAT France has put us oft to rout To lie awake and every hour to know With powder, which ourselves found out ; How many people read his tombstone And laughs at us for fools in print GRATIS.

Of which our genius was the mint;

All this I easily admit, (October 11, 1802.)

For we have genius, France has wit. 45

But 'tis too bad, that blind and mad

To Frenchmen's wives each travelling A DIALOGUE BETWEEN

German goes, AN AUTHOR AND HIS FRIEND Expands his manly vigour by their sides,

Becomes the father of his country's foes Author. Come; your opinion of my And turns their warriors oft to parrimanuscript !

cides. Friend, Dear Joe! I would almost as

49 soon be whipt.

ON THE CURIOUS CIRCUMAuthor. But I will have it ! Friend. If it must be had—(hesitating)

STANCE You write so ill, I scarce could read the

THAT IN THE GERMAN LANGUAGE THE hand

SUN IS FEMININE AND THE MOON Author. A mere evasion !

MASCULINE
Friend. And you spell so bad,
That what I read I could not understand. OUR English poets, bad and good, agree

To make the Sun a male, the Moon a she.
He drives his dazzling diligence on high,

In verse, as constantly as in the sky; Mwpooopía, OR WISDOM IN FOLLY And cheap as blackberries our sonnets

shew TOM SLOTHFUL talks, as slothful Tom The Moon, Heaven's huntress, with HER beseems,

silver bow; What he shall shortly gain and what By which they'd teach us, if I guess be doing,

aright, Then drops asleep, and so prolongs his Man rules the day, and woman rules the dreams

night. And thus enjoys at once what half the In Germany they just reverse the thing ; world are wooing.

The Sun becomes a queen, the Moon a

king.

Now, that the Sun should represent the 47

women, Each Bond-street buck conceits, unhappy The Moon the men, to me seem'd mighty elf !

humming ; He shews his clothes! Alas ! he shews · And when I first read German, made me himself.

stare. O that they knew, these overdrest self- Surely it is not that the wives are there lovers,

As common as the Sun to lord and loon, What hides the body oft the mind dis- And all their husbands horned as the covers.

Moon.

46

50

53

SPOTS IN THE SUN

EPITAPH

ON HIMSELF My father confessor is strict and holy, Mi Fili, still he cries, peccare noli. Here sleeps at length poor Col., and And yet how oft I find the pious man

without screamingAt Annette's door, the lovely courtesan! Who died as he had always lived, aHer soul's deformity the good man wins

dreaming : And not her charms ! he comes to hear Shot dead, while sleeping, by the gout her sins !

withinGood father! I would fain not do thee

Alone and all unknown, at Edinbro' in wrong ;

an Inn.

1803 But ah ! I fear that they who oft and

54 long Stand gazing at the sun, to count each An excellent adage commands that we spot,

should Must sometimes find the sun itself too | Relate of the dead that alone which is hot.

good;

| But of the great Lord who here lies in 51

lead WHEN Surface talks of other people's We know nothing good but that he is worth

dead. He has the weakest memory on earth ! Friend, Nov. 12, 1809. And when his own good deeds he deigns to mention,

55 His memory still is no whit better grown ;

MOTTO
But then he makes up for it, all will own,
By a prodigious talent of invention.

FOR A TRANSPARENCY DESIGNED BY
WASHINGTON ALLSTON AND

BRISTOL ON
52

CLAMATION DAY'- June 29, 1814. TO MY CANDLE

We've fought for Peace, and conquer'd THE FAREWELL EPIGRAM

it at last, Good Candle, thou that with thy brother,

The rav'ning vulture's leg seems fetter'd

fast ! Fire,

Britons, rejoice! and yet be wary too : Art my best friend and comforter at

The chain may break, the clipt wing night,

sprout anew. Just snuff'd, thou look'st as if thou didst desire

[The following was suggested by Coleridge as an That I on thee an epigram should write.

alternative, but the former was used :--) Dear Candle, burnt down to a finger

joint, Thy own flame is an epigram of sight; We've conquer'd us a Peace, like lads 'Tis short, and pointed, and all over

true metalled : light, Yet gives most light and burns the keenest

And Bankrupt Nap's accompts seem all
at the point.
Valete et Plaudite.

now settled.
Cottle's Early Recollections, ii. 145.

EX

HIBITED

AT

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