Debt Wish: Entrepreneurial Cities, U.S. Federalism, and Economic Development

Voorkant
University of Pittsburgh Press, 1996 - 296 pagina's

Albert Sbragia considers American urban government as an investor whether for building infrastructure or supporting economic development.† Over time, such investment has become disconnected from the normal political and administrative processes of local policymaking through the use of special public spending authorities like water and sewer commissions and port, turnpike, and public power authorities.

Sbragia explores how this entrepreneurial activity developed and how federal and state policies facilitated or limited it.† She also analyzes the implications of cities creating innovative, special-purpose quasi-governments to circumvent and dilute state control over city finances, diluting their own authority in the process.

 

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Inhoudsopgave

Introduction
1
State Governments as Entrepreneurs
19
Cities as Investors
44
The Provision of Services Municipal Government Technology and Debt
62
The Institutionalization of Limits
80
Circumvention by Law and Market
102
Circumvention by Law and Government
135
Local Entrepreneurship via Tax Exemption
163
Washington Takes Control
188
Conclusion
210
Notes
223
Bibliography
265
Index
289
Copyright

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Pagina 12 - The most visible and enduring change in 1975 was the creation of a new set of institutions to supervise New York City's finances: the Municipal Assistance Corporation (MAC) and the Emergency Financial Control Board (EFCB...

Over de auteur (1996)

Alberta M. Sbragia is professor of political science at the University of Pittsburgh and director of the Center for West European Studies.

Bibliografische gegevens