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being apprehensive it might injure the play, the Manager, with great keeness replied, “ Pha, my dear Doctor, do not be fearful of squibs, when we have been fitting almost these two hours upon a barrel of gunpowder.The piece, however, contrary to Mr. Coleman's expectation, was received with uncommon applause by the audience; and Goldsmith's pride was so hurt by the severity of the above observation, that it entirely put an end to his friendship for the gentleman who made it.

Notwithstanding the great success of his pieces, by some of which, it is asserted upon good authority, he cleared 1800l. in one year, his circumstances were by no means in a prosperous situation! partly owing to the liberality of his difpofition, and partly to an unfortunate habit he had contracted of gaming, with the arts of which he was very little acquainted, and consequently became the prey of those who were unprincipled enough to take advantage of his igno

rance.

Just before his death he had formed a design for executing an Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences, the prospectus of which he actually printed and distributed among his acquaintance. In this work several of his literary friends (particularly Sir Joshua Reynolds, Doctor Johnson, Mr. Beauclerc and Mr. Garrick) had promised to affift, and to furnish him with articles on different subjects. He

had

had entertained the most fanguine expectations from the success of it. The undertaking, however, did not meet with that encouragement from the booksellers which he had imagined it would undoubtedly receive;

and he used to lament this circumstance almost to the last hour of his existence.

He had been for some years afslicted, at different times, with a violent stranguary, which contributed not a little to imbitter the latter part of his life ; and which, united with the vexations he suffered upon other occalions, brought on a kind of habitual defpondency. In this unhappy disposition he was attacked by a nervous fever, which being improperly treated, terminated in his diffolution on the 4th day of April, 1774, in the forty-fifth year of his age. His friends, who were very numerous and respectable, had determined to bury him in Westminster abbey, where a tablet was to have been erected to his meinory. His paul was to have been supported by Lord Shelburne, Lord Louth, Sir Joshua Reynolds, the Hon. Mr. Beauclerc, Mr. Edmond Burke and Mr. Garrick ; but from some unaccountable circumstances this defign was dropped, and his remains were privately deposited in the Temple burial ground. * b 2

As

* A subscription, however, has since been raised by his friends, to defray the expense of a marble monument which is now executed by Mr. Nollikens, an eminent ftatuary in

London

As to his character it is strongly illustrated by Mr. Pope's line,

6. In wit a man, simplicity a child." The learned leisure he loved to enjoy was too often interrupted by distresses which arose from the openness of his temper, and which sometimes threw him into loud fits of paflion; but this impetuosity was corrected by a moment's reflection, and his servants ( xiii ) have been known upon these occasions, purposely to throw themselves in his way, that they inight profit by it immediately after; for he who had the good fortune to be reproved was certain of being rewarded for it. His disappointments at other times made him peevish and sullen, and he has often left a party of convivial friends abruptly in the evening, in order to go home and brood over his misfortunes.

have

London, and is placed in Westminster-abbey, between Gay's monument and the Duke of Argyle's, in the poet's corner, with the following Latin inscription, written by his friend Dr. Samuel Johnson :

OLIVARII GOLDSMITH,

POETÆ, PHYSICI, HISTORICI,
QUI NULLUM FERE SCRIBENDI GENUS,

NON TETIGIT,
NULLUM. QUOD TETIGIT NON ORNAVIT :
SIVE RISUS ESSENT MOVENDI,

SIVE LACRIMÆ,
AFFECTUUM POTENS AT LENIS DOMINATOR :

INGENIO SUBLIMIS, VIVIDUS, VERSATILIS, ORATIONE GRANDIS, NITIDUS, VENUSTUS:

HOC MONUMENTO MEMORIAM COLUIT

SODALIUM

AMOR

AMICORUM FIDES,

LECTORUM

VENERATIO.

ELFINIÆ

IN HIBERNIA NATUS MDCCXXIX

EBLANA

LITERIS

ISTITUTUS :

LONDINI OBIIT MDCCLXXIV.

The universal esteem in which his poems are held, and the repeated pleasure they give in the perusal, are striking proofs of their merit. He was a studious and correct observer of nature, happy in the selection of his images, in the choice of his subjects, and in the harmony of his versification; and, though his embarrassed situation prevented hiin from putting the last hand to many of his productions, his Hermit, his Traveller, and his Deserted Village, bid fair to claim a place among the most finished pieces in the Englifh language.

As different accounts have been given of this ingenious man, the Writer of these anecdotes cannot conclude without declaring, that they are all founded upon facts, and collected by one who lived with him upon the most friendly footing for a great num.

sorrow more sensibly than that which was occasioned by his death.

years,
and never felt any

ber of

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ADIEU, sweet bard ! to each fine feeling true,
Thy virtues many, and thy foibles few;
Those formd to charm e’en vicious minds,--and thete
With harmless mirth the social foul to please.
Another's woe thy heart could always melt :
None gave more free,--for none more deeply felt.
Sweet bard, adieu ! thy own harmonious lays
Have sculptur’d out thy monument of praise :
Yes,--thefe survive to time's remoteit day ;
While drops the bust, and boastful tombs decay.
Reader, if number'd in the muses' train,
Go, tune the lyre, and imitate his strain;
But, if no poet thou, reverse the plan,
Depart in peace, and imitate the man.

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