Letters of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Volume 1

Voorkant
Houghton, Mifflin, 1895 - 4 pagina's
The letters of Samuel Taylor Coleridge are collected in this volume. Coleridge was a voluminous letter writer, and a significant portion of his correspondence is available here.
 

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Pagina 386 - For not to think of what I needs must feel, But to be still and patient, all I can; And haply by abstruse research to steal From my own nature all the natural man This was my sole resource, my only plan: Till that which suits a part infects the whole, And now is almost grown the habit of my soul.
Pagina 388 - O Lady! we receive but what we give And in our life alone does Nature live: Ours is her wedding garment, ours her shroud! And would we aught behold of higher worth, Than that inanimate cold world allowed To the poor loveless ever-anxious crowd, Ah! from the soul itself must issue forth A light, a glory, a fair luminous cloud Enveloping the Earth And from the soul itself must there be sent A sweet and potent voice, of its own birth, Of all sweet sounds the life and element!
Pagina 202 - For ye are not come unto the mount that might be touched, and that burned with fire, nor unto blackness, and darkness, and tempest : and the sound of a trumpet, and the voice of words ; which voice they that heard entreated that the word should not be spoken to them any more...
Pagina 105 - He is wise in heart, and mighty in strength: Who hath hardened himself against him, and hath prospered? Which removeth the mountains, and they know not: Which overturneth them in his anger. Which shaketh the earth out of her place, And the pillars thereof tremble.
Pagina 198 - See the wretch, that long has tost On the thorny bed of pain, At length repair his vigour lost, And breathe and walk again : The meanest floweret of the vale, The simplest note that swells the gale, The common sun, the air, the skies, To him are opening paradise.
Pagina 105 - And they shall build houses, and inhabit them; and they shall plant vineyards, and eat the fruit of them. They shall not build, and another inhabit; they shall not plant, and another eat: for as the days of a tree are the days of my people, and mine elect shall long enjoy the work of their hands.
Pagina 388 - It were a vain endeavour, Though I should gaze for ever On that green light that lingers in the west: I may not hope from outward forms to win The passion and the life, whose fountains are within.
Pagina 394 - There was a time when, though my path was rough, This joy within me dallied with distress, And all misfortunes were but as the stuff Whence Fancy made me dreams of happiness: For hope grew round me, like the twining vine, And fruits and foliage, not my own, seemed mine.
Pagina 242 - And behold, the LORD passed by, and a great and strong wind rent the mountains, and brake in pieces the rocks before the LORD; but the LORD was not in the wind: and after the wind an earthquake; but the LORD was not in the earthquake: And after the earthquake a fire; but the LORD was not in the fire: and after the fire a still small voice.
Pagina 201 - And the angel which I saw stand upon the sea and upon the earth lifted up his hand to heaven, and sware by him that liveth for ever and ever, who created heaven and the things that therein are, and the earth and the things that therein are, and the sea and the things which are therein that there should be time no longer...

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