The Cambridge History of Africa, Volume 2

Voorkant
J. D. Fage, John Desmond Clark, Roland Anthony Oliver
Cambridge University Press, 1975 - 886 pagina's
After the prehistory of Volume I, Volume II of The Cambridge History of Africa deals with the beginnings of history. It is about 500 BC that historical sources begin to embrace all Africa north of the Sahara and, by the end of the period, documentation is also beginning to appear for parts of sub-Saharan Africa. North of the Sahara, this situation arises since Africans were sharing in the major civilizations of the Mediterranean world. It is shown that these northern Africans were not simply passive recipients of Phoenician, Greek, Roman and Arab influences, or of the great religions and cultures of Judaism, Christianity and Islam coming from the Semitic world. They adapted these things to their own particular needs and purposes, and sometimes too contributed to their general development. But the North African civilization failed to make headway south of the Sahara.
 

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Inhoudsopgave

Introduction
1
North Africa in the period of Phoenician
87
North Africa in the Hellenistic and Roman
148
The Nilotic Sudan and Ethiopia c 660 Bc to c AD
210
TransSaharan contacts and the Iron
272
The emergence of Bantu Africa
342
The Christian period in Mediterranean
410
The Arab conquest and the rise of Islam
490
Christian Nubia
556
1o The Fatimid revolution 861973 and
589
The Sahara and the Sudan from the Arab conquest
637
Bibliographical essays
685
Bibliography
719
Index
771
Copyright

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Pagina 727 - Palynological evidence for an important change in the vegetation of the Omo basin between 2.5 and 2 million years ago.

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