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COMPRISING THE PERIOD FROM THE TWENTY-SECOND DAY OF MAY TO THE
FIFTEENTH DAY OF JUNE, 1922, INCLUSIVE

[graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small]

103

4.153

Hist, -Pol. Sci Par Carswell

5-2-52 077877

CANADA

House of Commons Debates

OFFICIAL REPORT

Monday, May 22, 1922

The House met at three o'clock. AGRICULTURE AND COLONIZATION On motion of Hon. Mackenzie King the name of Mr. Bouchard was substituted for that of Mr. Stein on the Committee of Agriculture and Colonization, the Banking and Commerce Committee, and the Committee on Miscellaneous Private Bills.

GENOA CONFERENCE

Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING presented a return showing correspondence exchanged between the Government of Italy anad the Canadian Government with reference to the International Conference at Genoa, including Order in Council appointing delegates from Canada and instructions given to such delegates by the Canadian Government.

SOLDIER SETTLEMENT ACT AMENDMENT

Mr. JAMES MALCOLM (North Bruce) moved for leave to introduce Bill, No. 108, to amend the Soldier Settlement Act, 1919. He said:

Section 57 of the Soldier Settlement Act contains the following clause:

"From all sales and grants of land made by the board all mines and minerals shall be and shall be deemed to be reserved-"

And so on. This clause works an unintentional hardship on men located in the province of Ontario purchasing land and tendering the same to the board as security for the loans. Take an illustration from my own district. Tracy J. Anderson, a returned soldier, desires to continue his occupation of farming in his own county. He buys a farm, and conveys it in security for a loan to the Soldier Settlement Board. When he pays off his loan he finds that the title given him has a reservation as to mines and minerals, while the title he conveyed to the board, had no such reservation. This bill simply covers that point as follows:

Section 57 of the Soldier Settlement Act, 1919, Chapter 71 of the Statutes, of 1919 is amended by adding thereto the following proviso

"Provided, however, that the provisions of this section shall only apply to sales or grants of ungranted land belonging to His Majesty in the right of the Dominion, or lands heretofore granted by His Majesty in the right aforesaid, in which His majesty reserves the mines or minerals and which lands are situated in the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan or Alberta, or in the Northwest, or, the Yukon Territory, or are lands that have been transferred to His majesty in the right of the Dominion of Canada by the Government of the province of British Columbia."

The lands in Ontario which have a clear title when given to the Soldier Settlement Board as security should not come under this provision for reservation of minerals.

Motion agreed to and Bill read the first time.

BANKRUPTCY ACT AMENDMENT

Sir LOMER GOUIN (Minister of Justice) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 107, to amend the Bankruptcy Act. He said: The Bankruptcy Act was first passed in 1919, amended in 1920, and brought into force by proclamation on the 1st of July of that year. It is based largely on the English act as revised and consolidated in 1914. Certain substantial alterations however were made in the English act to accommodate it to the different conditions existent in Canada.

The Dominion act has been in force, therefore, for less than two years. The period of its application has been one when business conditions have been adverse and insolvency more prevalent than is the case under normal conditions of trading. Furthermore, it is to be remembered that an act of this character, making substantial changes in the law governing the commercial life of the country, must result necessarily in some confusion and uncer. tainty in the early stages of its application. In these circumstances it is not surprising that some criticism has been forthcoming, but I venture to think that to make substantial changes in a highly technical

REVISED EDITION

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