From Adam Smith to Philip Snowden: A History of Free Trade in Great Britain

Voorkant
T. F. Unwin Limited, 1925 - 88 pagina's
 

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Pagina 15 - The schoolboy whips his taxed top; the beardless youth manages his taxed horse, with a taxed bridle, on a taxed road ; and the dying Englishman, pouring his medicine, which has paid...
Pagina 7 - What is prudence in the conduct of every private family, can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom. If a foreign country can supply us with a commodity cheaper than we ourselves can make it, better buy it of them with some part of the produce of our oWn industry, employed in a way in which we have some advantage.
Pagina 16 - ... paid a license of a hundred pounds for the privilege of putting him to death. His whole property is then immediately taxed from two to ten per cent. Besides the probate, large fees are demanded for burying him in the chancel ; his virtues are handed down to posterity on taxed marble ; and he is then gathered to his fathers, — to be taxed no more.
Pagina 38 - Protection, because it conduces to his own individual benefit ; but it may be that I shall leave a name sometimes remembered with expressions of good-will in the abodes of those whose lot it is to labour and to earn their daily bread by the sweat of their brow, when they shall recruit their exhausted strength with abundant and untaxed food, the sweeter because it is no longer leavened with a sense of injustice.
Pagina 5 - I shall therefore venture to acknowledge, that, not only as a man, but as a British subject, I pray for the flourishing commerce of Germany, Spain, Italy, and even France itself. I am at least certain that Great Britain, and all those nations, would flourish more, did their sovereigns and ministers adopt such enlarged and benevolent sentiments towards each other".
Pagina 7 - It is the maxim of every prudent master of a family never to attempt to make at home what it will cost him more to make than to buy. The tailor does not attempt to make his own shoes, but buys them of the shoemaker. The shoemaker does not attempt to make his own clothes, but employs a tailor.
Pagina 28 - Kingdom presents neither congrnity nor unity of purpose ; no general principles seem to have been applied. * * * The Tariff often aims at incompatible ends ; the duties are sometimes meant to be both productive of revenue and for protective objects, which are frequently inconsistent with each other...
Pagina 38 - The name which ought to be, and will be, associated with the success of those measures, is the name of one, who, acting, I believe, from pure and disinterested motives, has, with untiring energy, made appeals to our reason, and has enforced...
Pagina 38 - Sir, the name which ought to be, and which will be associated with the success of these measures is the name of a man who, acting, I believe, from pure and disinterested motives, has advocated their cause with untiring energy, and by appeals to reason...
Pagina 47 - Your iron industry is dead, dead as mutton; your coal industries, which depend greatly on the iron Industries, are languishing. Your silk industry is dead, assassinated by the foreigner. Your woollen industry is in articulo mortis, gasping, struggling. Your cotton industry is seriously sick. The shipbuilding industry, which held out longest of all, is come to a standstill. Turn your eyes where you will, survey any branch of British industry you like, you will find signs of mortal disease.

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