Accounting for Tastes

Voorkant
Harvard University Press, 30 jun. 2009 - 278 pagina's
Economists generally accept as a given the old adage that there's no accounting for tastes. Nobel Laureate Gary Becker disagrees, and in this lively new collection he confronts the problem of preferences and values: how they are formed and how they affect our behavior. He argues that past experiences and social influences form two basic capital stocks: personal and social. He then applies these concepts to assessing the effects of advertising, the power of peer pressure, the nature of addiction, and the function of habits. This framework promises to illuminate many other realms of social life previously considered off-limits by economists.
 

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Inhoudsopgave

Preferences and Values
3
De Gustibus Non Est Disputandum
24
A Theory of Rational Addiction
50
Rational Addiction and the Effect of Price on Consumption
77
An Empirical Analysis of Cigarette Addiction
85
Habits Addictions and Traditions
118
The Economic Wa of Looking at Life
139
A Theory of Social Interactions
162
A Note on Restaurant Pricing and Other Examples of Social Influences on Price
195
A Simple Theory of Advertising as a Good or Bad
203
Norms and the Formation of Preferences
225
Spouses and Beggars Love and Sympathy
231
Acknowledgments
241
References
245
Index
259
Copyright

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Over de auteur (2009)

Gary S. Becker is University Professor of Economics and Sociology at the University of Chicago. In 1992, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics.

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