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ALEXANDER POPE.

GEORGE BERKELEY

510

Pride.

454 Poetry

511

Sound an Echo to the Sense

455 South Sea Scheme, (note).

511

Evanescence of Poetic Fame..

455 National Luxury the Road to National

The Scale of Being.

456

Ruin

513

Omnipresence of the Deity..

457

Address to Bolingbroke...

457 ELIZABETH TOLLET

515

The Toilet....

458 On a Death's-Head

515

Description of Belinda.

4.58

Winter Song.

516

The Baron offers Sacrifice for Success. 459

The Sylphs--their Functions

459 WILLIAM COLLINS

516

The Dying Christian.

461 Ode to Tear..

517

His Prose..

462 Ode to Evening

519

Letter to Steele on Early Death. 462 The Passions.

520

Shakspeare

463 Ode to the Brave..

523

Homer and Virgil compared

464 Ode to Mercy

523

On the Death of Thomson

524

ROBERT BLAIR

465

The Grave....

465 SAMUEL RICHARDSON...

525

Death-divided Friendships

466 Moral Sentiments-Benevolence, Ca-

Death, the good Man's Path to Heaven 466 lumny, Censure, Children, Educa-

tion

527

JAMES THOMSON

468 Friendship, General Observations 528

Loves of the Birds.

469 The Good Man

528

A Summer Scene...

470 The Good Woman, Youth.

529

A Thunder-Shower.

470

Summer Evening

470 | THOMAS SHERLOCK

529

The Springs of Rivers.

471 Different Ends of Religion and Infi-

A Man perishing in the Snows of

delity

530

Winter...

472 The Information the Gospel gives most

The various Sufferings in Winter 473

desirable...

530

Moral of the Seasons

473 Christ and Mohammed compared..... 532

Hymn on the Seasons......

474

From the Castle of Indolence.

477 LADY MARY WORTLEY MONTAGU. 532

Eastern Manners and Language 533

ISAAC WATTS..

479 Trance in 1718...

535

A Summer Evening.

480 Female Education.

535

The Rose...

481

Few Happy Matches.

481 JOHN BYROM .

538

Looking Upward.

482 A Pastoral

539

Seeking a divine Calm in a restless

The Three Black Crows.

540

World...

483

Launching into Eternity.

483 WILLIAM KING

541

His Prose..

484 Virgil ..

541

General Directions relating to our A Repartee. .

543

Ideas...

484 Singular Conduct

544

Rules for Improvement by Conversa-

tion..

486 WILLIAM SHENSTONE,

546

The School Mistress

546

CONYERS MIDDLETON...

489

Cicero offers Himself to the Bar...... 490

490 | ROBERT DODSLEY

549

Close of Cicero's Consulship.

491 Emulation

550

Character of Pompey...

492 Temperance

550

Anger

551

IIENRY ST. JOHN (BOLINGBROKE).. 494 Woman

552

Absurdities of Useless Learning. 495 Rich and Poor

553

The Use of History.

497 Benevolence.

554

The World our Country.

497

Fortune not to be trusted.

498/ EDWARD YOUNG.

555

Introduction to the Night Thoughts,

PHILIP DODDRIDGE.

499

the Value of Time, &c. .

556

Letter to a Female Friend.

500 Man's Resolutions to Reform

559

Letter to his Wife.

501 Life and Death.

559

The true Use of Learning.

502 Dying Rich ...

559

Worldly Cares.

502

Society necessary for Happiness. 560

His Poetry

503 Insufficiency of Genius and Station

The Sabbath.

503

without Virtue.

560

Self-examination..

503 The Love of Praise.

562

Entering into Covenant

504 The Languid Lady

562

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-OSEPH BUTLER..

504 WILLIAM FALCONER.

562

Christianity a
Scheme imperfectly

The Vessel going to Pieces, Death of

comprehended

507

Albert the Commander.

503

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CATHERINE TALBOT.

566 | WILLIAM PITT, EARL OF CHATHAM.

A Sense of God's Presence

566 Our own Reason, and Others' Experi-

Self-Examination

567

ence to be used

643

All can do Good..

567

Importance of Time.

568 SIR WILLIAM BLACKSTONE...

645

Poetry

569

The Lawyer's Farewell to his Muse.. 645

Importance of Early Rising.

569

SAMUEL JOHNSON.

647

THOMAS CHATTERTON
570 Lines of Garrick, (note).

648

Death of Sir Charles Bandin.

571 Letter to Lord Chesterfield.

649

Resignation

577 The Voyage of Life..

653

Knowledge to be accommodated to the

MARK AKENSIDE.

578

Purposes of Life...

656

Introduction, The Subject proposed • 579 Right Improvement of Time.

657

Man's immortal Aspirations.

580 Duty of Forgiveness..

659

Cause of our Pleasure in Beauty 582 Solitude not Desirable...

600

Superiority of Moral Beauty.

582

Gayety and Good Humor

661

Taste.

583 The Conversation of Authors

661

Conclusion

584 Books and Tradition

662

Prevention of Evil Habits

662

THOMAS GRAY.

585

From the Preface to his Dictionary... 662

The Progress of Poetry

587 Reiections on Landing at Iona

663

The Bard..

590 Picture of the Miseries of War.

664

Elegy written in a Country Church-

Parallel between Diyden and Pope... 665

yard

596 Shakspeare

666

On a distant Prospect of Eton College 599 The Fate of Poverty

669

Song

602 Cardinal Wolsey.

669

Prose Works.

603 Charles XII

670

How he Spends his Time in the Coun-

Objects of Petition..

671

try

603 Folly of Procrastination.

671

Netley Abbey and Southampton.-

Beautiful Sunset.

604 MRS. GREVILLE.

672

To Mr. Nichols, on the Death of his Prayer for Indifference...

672
Mother.

605

To Mr. Mason, on the Death of his ROBERT LOWTH.

673

Wife .

606 Philosophy and Poetry compared as

Sources of Pleasure and Instruc-

TOBIAS SMOLLET.

606

tion...

674

The Tears of Scotland

• 607 Utility of Poetry, by Leigh Hunt, (note) 674

Ode to Leven Water

608 Sablimity of the Prophet Isaiah: 678

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EDMUND BURKE.

712

dent.

041 Efforts of English Abolitionists, (note) 713

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IF NOTE.-In using the “Compendium" with less advanced classes I have
deemed it better to commence with the authors of Queen Anne's reign--say
with Addison--and then, after having gone through the book, to go back to
our earliest literature, beginning with Sir John Mandeville. Others, on the
contrary, may think it more beneficial for all students, at the outset, to be made
familiar with our good old English. Which is the better way, every instructor
will of course decide for himself, according to circumstances. C. D. C

COMPENDIUM

OF

ENGLISH LITERATURE.

SIR JOHN MANDEVILLE. 1300-1371.

The first prose writer which occurs in the annals of English Literature, is the ancient and renowned traveller, Sir John Mandeville. He was born ai St. Albans, about the year 1300. Stimulated by an unconquerable curiosity to see foreign countries, he departed from England in 1322, and continued abroad for thirty-four years; during which time his person and appearance had so changed, that, on his return, his friends, who had supposed him dead, did not know him. But so fixed was his habit of roving, that he set out a second time from his own country, and died at Leige, (Belgium,) November 17, 1371. John Bale, in his catalogue of British writers, gives him the following fine character, as translated by Hakluyt:

« John Mandevil Knight, borne in the Towne of S. Albans, was so well given to the study of Learning from his childhood, that he seemed to plant a good part of his felicitie in the same: for he supposed, that the honour of his Birth would nothing availe him, except he could render the same moro honourable, by his knowledge in good letters. Having therefore well grounded himselfe in Religion, by reading the Scriptures, he applied his Studies to the Art of Physicke, a Profession worthy a noble Wit: but amongst other things, he was ravished with a mightie desire to see the greater parts of the World, as Asia and Africa. Having therefore provided all things necessary for his journey, he departed from his Countrey in the yeere of Christ 1322; and, as another Ulysses, returned home, after the space of thirty-four yeeres, and was then knowen to a very fewe. In the time of his Travaile he was in Scythia, the greater and lesse Armenia, Egypt, both Libyas, Arabia, Syria, Media, Mesopotamia, Persia, Chaldæa, Greece, Illyrium, Tartarie, and divers other Kingdomes of the World: and having gotten by this meanes the knowledge of the Languages, least so many and great varieties, and things miraculous, whereof himself had bene an eie witnes, should perish in oblivion, he committed his whole Travell of thirty-four yeeres to writing, in three divers tongues, English, French, and Latine. Being arrived again in England, and having seene the wickednes of that age, he gave out this Speech: 'In our time, (said he) i may be spoken more truly then of olde, that Vertue is gone, the Church is under foote, the Clergie is in errour, the Devill raigneth, and Simonie beareth

the sway.

1 A town of Hertfordshire, about twenty miles north of London.
2 They were published in 1356.

B

2*

17

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