The Cambridge History of Africa, Volume 8

Voorkant
J. D. Fage, Michael Crowder, Roland Anthony Oliver
Cambridge University Press, 1984 - 1030 pagina's
The eighth and final volume of The Cambridge History of Africa covers the period 1940-75. It begins with a discussion of the role of the Second World War in the political decolonisation of Africa. Its terminal date of 1975 coincides with the retreat of Portugal, the last European colonial power in Africa, from its possessions and their accession to independence. The fifteen chapters which make up this volume examine on both a continental and regional scale the extent to which formal transfer of political power by the European colonial rulers also involved economic, social and cultural decolonisation. A major theme of the volume is the way the African successors to the colonial rulers dealt with their inheritance and how far they benefited particular economic groups and disadvantaged others. The contributors to this volume represent different disciplinary traditions and do not share a single theoretical perspective on the recent history of the continent, a subject that is still the occasion for passionate debate.
 

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Inhoudsopgave

Introduction I
1
prelude to decolonisation
8
by MICHAEL CRow
17
Decolonisation and the problems of independence
52
PanAfricanism since 1940
95
by IAN DUFFIELD Department of History
101
Social and cultural change
142
The economic evolution of developing Africa
192
East and Central Africa
383
The Horn of Africa
458
Io Egypt Libya and the Sudan 5
523
The Maghrib
564
I4 Zaire Rwanda and Burundi
698
Portuguesespeaking Africa
755
Bibliographical essays 8 II
811
Bibliography
905

Southern Africa
260
Englishspeaking West Africa 33 I
333

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