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II.
Here is no quarrelling for crowns,

Nor fear of changes in our fate;
No trembling at the great ones frowns,

Nor any slavery of state.

III. Here's no disguise nor treachery,

Nor any deep-conceald design; From blood and plots this place is free,

And calm as are those looks of thine.

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IV.
Here let us fit and bless our stars,

Who did such happy quiet give,
As that remov'd from noise of wars

In one another's hearts we live.

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V.
Why should we entertain a fear?

Love cares not how the world is turn'd:
If crouds of dangers shou'd appear,

Yet friendship can be unconcern'd.

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VI.
We wear about us such a charm,

No horror can be our offence ;
For mischief's self can do no harm
To friendship or to innocence.

VII.
Let's mark how soon Apollo's beams

Command the Rocks to quit their mcat,

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And not entreat the neighb’ring streams

To quench their thirst, but cool their heat.

VIII.
In such a scorching age as this

Who would not ever seek a shade
Deserve their happiness to miss,

As having their own peace betray'd.

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IX.
But we (of one another's mind

Assur’d) the boist'rous world disdain ;
With quiet fouls, and unconfin'd,

Enjoy what princes with in vain.

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TENDRES.DESIRS'

OUT OF

FRENCH

PROSE

BY THE SAME.

Go soft desires, love's gentle progeny,

And on the heart of charming Sylvia ' seize,'
Then quickly back again return to me,

Since that's the only cure for my disease;
But if you miss her breast whom I adore,
Then take your flight, and visit mine no more.

LOVE ARM’D.

BY MRS. APHRA BEHN.

Love in fantastick triumph sat,
Whilft bleeding hearts around him flow'd, .
For whom fresh pains he did create,
And strange tyrannick power he shew'd;
From thy bright eyes he took his fire,
Which round about in sport he hurl'd;
But 'twas from mine he took desire,
Enough to undo the amorous world.

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From me he took his fighs and tears,
From thee his pride and cruelty ;
From me his languishments and fears,
And every killing dart from thee;
Thus thou and I the god have arm’d,
And set him up a deity ;
But my poor heart alone is harm'd,
Whilst thine the victor is, and free.

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* Børn 1645? dyed 1689. Her maiden name was Johnson, THE RESOLVE.

BY LADY CHUDLEIGH.

I.
For what the world admires I'll wish no more,

Nor court that airy nothing of a name :
Such fleeting shadows let the proud adore,

Let them be suppliants for an empty fame.

Il.

If reason rules within, and keeps the throne, 5

While the inferior faculties obey,
And all her laws without reluctance own,

Accounting none more fit, more just than they:

III.
If virtue my free foul unsully'd keeps,

Exempting it from passion and from stain :
If no black guilty thoughts disturb my sleeps,

And no fast crimes my vext remembrance pain;

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IV.

If, tho' I pleasure find in living here,

I yet can look on death without surprize : If I've a soul above the reach of fear,

15 And which will nothing mean or fordid prize;

* Mary, daughter to Richard Lee, esq. and wife offer George Chudleigh, bart. Born 1656; dyed 1710.

V.
A foul, which cannot be depress'd by grief,

Nor too much rais’d by the sublimest joy ;
Which can, when troubled, give itself relief;

And to advantage all its thoughts employ;

VI.
Then am I happy in my humbler state,

Altho’ not crown’d with glory, nor with bays,
A mind, that triumphs over vice and fate,

Esteems it mean to court the world for praise.

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