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'T H E

ELEMENTS

OF

MORAL SCIENCE.

BY FRANCIS WAYLAND, D. D.,

LATE PRESIDENT OF BROWN UNIVERSITY, AND PROFESSOR
OF MORAL PHILOSOPHY.

SEVENTY-SEVENTH THOUSAND.

ANSFERRED TO
UOEW LIBRARY

BOSTON:

GOULD AND LINCOLN,

89 WASHINGTON STREET.

NEW YORK: SHELDON AND COMPANY
CINCINNATI: GEO. S. BLANCHARD.

78.918

Entored, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1835, by

FRANCIS WAYLAND,

In the District Clerk's Office of the District Court of Rhode Island

PRIXTED BY

GEORO E C. RAND & A VERY.

BM W30

PRE FACE.

In presenting to the public a new treatise upon Moral Science, it may not be improper to state the circumstances which led to the undertaki and the design which it is intended to accomplish.

When it became my duty to instruct in Moral Philosophy, in Brown University, the text-book in use was the work of Dr. Paley. From many of his principles I found myself compelled to dissent, and, at first, I contented myself with staring to my classes my objections to the author, and offering my views, in the form of familiar conversations, upon several of the topics which he dis

These views, for my own convenience, I soon committed to paper, and delivered, in the form of lectures. In a few years, these lectures

, had become so far extended, that, to my surprise, they contained, by themselves, the elements of a different system from that of the text-book which I was teaching. To avoid the inconvenience of teaching two different systems, I undertook 10 reduce then to order, and to make such addi. tions, as would render the work in some measure complete within itself. I thus relinquished the work of Dr. Paley, and, for some time, have

Cuisses.

been in the habit of instructing solely by lecture. The success of the attempt exceeded my expectations, and encouraged me to hope, that the publication of what I had delivered to my classes, might, in some small degree, facilitate the study of moral science.

From these circumstances the work has derived its character. Being designed for the purposes of instruction, its aim is, to be simple, clear, and purely didactic. I have rarely gone into extended discussion, but have contented myself with the attempt to state the moral law, and the reason of it, in as_few and as comprehensive terms as possible. The illustration of the principles, and the application of them to cases in ordinary life, I have generally left to the instructor, or to the student himself. Hence, also, I have omitted every thing which relates to the history of opinions, and have made but little allusion even to the opinions themselves, of those from whom I dissent. To have acted otherwise, would have extended the undertaking greatly heyond the limits which I had assigned to myself'; and it seemed to me not to belong to the desigu which I had in view. A work which should attempt to exhibit what was true, appeared to me inore desirable than one which should point out what was exploded, discuss what was doubtful, or disprove what was false.

In the course of the work, I have quoted but few authorities, as, in preparing it, I have referred to but few books. I make this remark in no manner for the sake of laying claim to originality, bui to avoid the imputation of using the labors of

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